Plants

and

People

 

A Social Studies Unit

 

for Grades 1-2

by Karen Bird

 (Contact: bird@favorites.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goals 

 

Students will be able to identify foods that come from plants and what parts of the plants they come from.

 

Students will be able to explain how different cultures use plants.

 

Students will be able to explain many other ways plants are used by humans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Plants are very useful to people! Probably the most important use is food. Sometimes we eat the plants themselves, as when we eat apples, peas, lettuce or potatoes. But even when we eat meat or drink milk we are using foods that come from an animal that eats plants.

People get food from many kinds of plants, or parts of plants. Corn, rice,and wheat come from seeds of plants. They are a major source of food in most parts of the world. Breads and cereals come from these grains. When we eat beets, or carrots, we are eating the roots of plants. We eat leaves when we eat lettuce, cabbage, or spinach. Celery is a stem, as well as potatoes. They are actually stems that grow underground. Broccoli is a flower. Many drinks come from plants like juices and hot cocoa.

People also use plants for building shelter. Trees give us wood for houses. Some people use sticks, grass, bark and leaves to make huts for living. Wood is also used to make paper and cardboard. Even some rope and twine are made from plants.

Plants give us heat for cooking and staying warm. People burn wood or use coal, oil, or gas. Coal, oil, and gas come from dead plants that lived millions of years ago.

Plants have given us many useful drugs. Some chemicals they produce are deadly, but small amounts can be very useful for treating illnesses. Some common drugs that come from plants are jojoba, aloe, foxglove, quinine morphine, codine, and atrophine. People today examine plants from all over the world to search for new and better medicines.

Many kinds of clothing are made of fabrics that come from plants. Cotton is woven into denim to make pants and jackets, or lightweight cloth for shirts or dresses. Most of the clothing we wear is made from cotton or has some cotton in it.

Many musical instruments are made from plants. Many of the wind instruments use a special reed that comes from a plant. Many string instruments are made from wood. Also some drums and gourds are made from hollow plants.

People have found many uses for plants. Plants are an invaluable resource to us. We must use them with care and never waste the plants we have.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACTIVITIES

 

PLANTS AS FOOD

 

PLANTS FOR OTHER USES

 

PLANTS IN OTHER CULTURES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I. Plants as Food

Activity 1: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants as food by identifying where different foods come from. Students will identify what they had for dinner last night, or breakfast this morning. When each food is mentioned, the teacher writes it on the board. After there is a list of several foods, the teacher goes through each item and helps students identify where the food came from. For example, potatoes are grown in the ground. If the food is not a plant, like hamburgers, that item can go in a separate column and the bun can be added to the list of plant foods. It would be a good idea to have many different pictures on hand, like wheat or potatoes. Students can then draw a picture of a food item they like that comes from a plant. Materials: pictures of many common food plants, paper, markers or crayons. Time: 40 minutes.

Activity 2: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants as food by identifying where different foods come from. Students can be in small groups for this activity. Each group is given pictures of 10-15 different food items, (or an ad from the paper and students can cut their own pictures). As a group they decide which foods came from plants and which did not. They can glue the food items from plants onto a piece of construction paper, making a collage titled, Food From Plants. Materials: many pictures of different kinds of food items cut from grocery ads or other resources, glue, construction paper. Time: 45 minutes.

Activity 3: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants as food by learning about different grains. Have a representative from a cereal manufacturing company like Honeyville Grain, located in Honeyville, Utah, come visit the students to teach them about different grains and their importance to us as food. It would be good if they could bring samples of different grains for students to see and feel. They can explain how cereals are made. They might also be able to tell the students about the different nutritional value of different grains and which cereals are packaged and shipped to third world nations to help children who are suffering with malnutrition. Preparation: Make arrangements with a local company to come to your classroom.

Time: 1 hour.

Activity 4: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants as food by identifying what parts of plants food comes from. Teacher puts a large picture of a plant on the board and asks a student to come point to the leaves. Then ask another student to point to the roots. Do the same with seeds, stems, flowers, and fruits. Label the plant so students do not forget the names of the different parts. Teacher holds up a food like an apple and asks, "What part of the plant do you think this comes from?" Repeat with different foods. Give groups of students several pictures of different plant foods. Have them separate them into piles according to what part of the plant it comes from. Then let them share with other groups. Materials: Large picture of plant with all the parts, food items, smaller pictures for students to group. Time: 45 minutes.

Activity 5: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants as food by identifying what parts of plants food comes from. This is a game called "Guess My Rule." Show a food item like a grain of wheat or rice. Students in turn say the name of a food that comes from that seed or say another seed. If the item held up is a banana, students must say the name of another fruit or food that is made from fruit. If item held up is a leaf, students must say another food from leaves like spinach, or lettuce. Materials: many food items. Time 20 minutes.

Activity 6: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants as food by identifying where different foods come from. Students need to remember everything they eat for lunch for this activity. It is a good idea to do this as soon as they come in from lunch break so they can remember. They need to save any packaging that they have listing ingredients. As students tell what they had for lunch, write the food on the board, only listing the items one time. Have students pick one item from the board and draw a picture of it. Make sure all items are drawn. Some students can do more than one illustration. Using hula hoops on the floor or large circles drawn on butcher paper in a Venn diagram, have students put their illustration in the correct circle or overlapping area according to the source of that food. Students should help each other if they get stuck. If there is a food in question, leave it on the outside of the circles to discuss later. After all foods are placed in the diagram, ask students if they ate more foods from plants or animals. Have students draw a simple graph to show how many food items are in each category. Materials: hula-hoops or picture of Venn diagram on butcher paper, paper for children's illustrations (maybe a half or quarter sheet), crayons or markers, paper for graphs. Time: 1 hour.

Activity 7: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants as food by making popcorn. Read The Popcorn Book. After the story, explain how you will pop the corn. Have students divide into small groups and pop microwave popcorn or use air poppers. While they are waiting to pop their popcorn, they can draw a picture or write a story about the history of popcorn. Eat, draw, write, and enjoy.

Materials: The Popcorn Book by Tomie DePaola, popcorn, several air poppers, microwave, bowls, helpers to supervise, paper for pictures or stories. Time: 40 minutes.

Activity 8: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants as food by making bread. Read The Little Red Hen. There are many versions of this book. This activity will take some thought on how you will make bread with 20-25 students. They can measure, stir and knead the dough. It will probably be easiest to model the steps one at a time up front and let each student in turn measure something and stir. Each group could make a small loaf of bread. Discuss with the students how the flour first grew as a plant before it was ground into flour. Time must be allowed for the bread to rise and bake. You will need to arrange the baking of the bread with the cooks. Materials: ingredients for the bread, measuring and stirring utensils, bowls, a knife to cut the loaves, napkins, and the book, The Little Red Hen. Time: 45 minutes actually doing the activity, but more time eating it after it is done an hour later. It would be good to have extra volunteers to help.

Activity 9: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants as food by identifying where different foods come from. Read a book about processing foods (see below). Place several raw foods or pictures around the room, (tomato, corn on the cob, peanuts, grapes, wheat on stalks, potatoes, apple, orange, and soybeans). Give students pictures or empty containers of processed foods, (apple juice, applesauce, fruit roll ups, bread, brownies, cake, cookies, cereal, chips, popcorn, tortilla, grape juice, raisins, jelly, orange juice, peanut butter, oil, french fries, mashed potatoes, baby food, crackers, spaghetti, noodles, tomato sauce, catsup, soy sauce, flour, pancake mix, etc.) Try to have an item for each student. Give each student an item and let them all have a turn to tell which plant the item came from. Some items will be easier than others to identify. You know your students. Give harder items to students who will benefit. Help students set up a display of the processed foods and the plants they came from. Materials: pictures or food items for raw foods (above), pictures or labels from processed foods (above), the book From Peanuts to Peanut Butter, by Melvin Burger or From Fruit to Jam, by Ali Mitgutsch. Time: 40 minutes.

Activity 10: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants as food by visiting a farm where plants are grown. Visit the Ronald V. Jensen Living Historical Farm. If this is done in the fall, students will have a hand's on experience pressing apple juice from apples and shucking corn from the fields. Contact the person in charge of arranging field trips at 435-797-1143. Cost is $2.00 per student.

II. Plants for Other Uses

Activity 11: Students will gain an understanding of how plants are used in their everyday lives by learning about fabrics and what fabrics are made of. Show a piece of cotton fabric and ask if anyone knows what it is made of. Show a cotton boll and let students see and touch it. Ask if anyone knows what it is. Show a portion of the video, "Tractors, Cottonpickers, and the Things Kids Wear". The whole video is 30 minutes long, so for grades 1-2 just show a portion. Have students stand up if they think cotton is touching them. Everyone should stand up, but if some don't, start naming things made of cotton like socks, denim jeans, canvas shoes, t-shirts, sweatshirts, underwear! Materials: cotton boll (you might be able to get this from Debra M. Spielmaker, State Ag in the Classroom Project Coordinator, 435-797-1657), the video "Tractors, Cottonpickers, and the Things Kids Wear" (you can borrow this from Debra). Time: 30 minutes.

Activity 12: Students will gain an understanding of how plants are used in their everyday lives by learning about fabrics and what fabrics are made of. Watch part of the video, "Tractors, Cottonpickers, and the Things Kids Wear". Discuss the process of manufacturing clothing. Have students draw a pair of pants and a shirt, or a dress on paper, and cut them out. Have several cloth samples for children to choose from. Let them pin the pictures onto the cloth and cut them out. This is harder than cutting paper and students may need help. Then students can draw a self-portrait and glue the clothing on their pictures. Materials: video, "Tractors, Cottonpickers, and the Things Kids Wear" from Debra M. Spielmaker, State Ag in the Classroom Project Coordinator, 435-797-1657;paper, pencils, sharp scissors, fabric samples. Ask students to bring some or find out if there are any mothers of students in your classroom who sew. They may have lots of scraps, ask a fabric store to donate scraps, or you can purchase remnants at any fabric store for a discount. Time: 40 minutes.

Activity 13: Students will gain an understanding of how plants are used in their everyday lives by learning about fabrics and what fabrics are made of. Read the story, How a Shirt Grew in the Field, by Rudolph Margurita. Have students draw illustrations of an article of clothing and the many different processes it went through to become what it is. Materials: Book, paper, markers or crayons. Time 35 minutes.

Activity 14: Students will gain an understanding of how plants are used in their everyday lives by learning about medicines that come from plants. Ask students if they have ever had a sunburn. Ask what they did to make it feel better. Ask if they ever had a parent rub aloe vera on their skin to make it feel better. Show an aloe vera plant or picture and a bottle of aloe vera gel. Tell students that plants give us many kinds of medicines that help us. Have different pictures of plants and the drugs that come from them and how they help us. Place different pictures at different tables; jojoba, ginseng, castor oil, foxglove for the heart, cinchona for quinine, belladonna for eye surgery. There are many more. A good resource for this activity is the Eyewitness Book: Plant distributed by World Book Encyclopedia. It has many good pictures of plants used for drugs. Have the students study the pictures and information in their groups and after a few minutes let them share what they discovered with the class. Materials: pictures or plants, creams or lotions made from plants, information sheets or books with pages marked for students to find out about the plant at their table. Time: 45 minutes.

Activity 15: Students will gain an understanding of how plants are used in their everyday lives by visiting a plant nursery and learning how plants make our surroundings beautiful. Take students to visit a nursery. Let them see all the beautiful plants and have a worker talk to the students about simple arrangements of plants when landscaping. If possible, let the students plant a flower or small plant to take home from the nursery. If not, let them take home seeds to plant at home or plant them in the classroom in paper cups. If it is not possible to visit a nursery, ask someone who works at a nursery to visit the classroom and bring some flowers and plants. Preparation: contact a local nursery to make arrangements, seeds or plants, paper cups or egg cartons cut apart, potting soil. Time: ? 1 hour.

Activity 16: Students will gain an understanding of how plants are used in their everyday lives by learning how plants make our surroundings beautiful. Show pictures of houses with and without landscaping. Ask them what they like and what makes a house attractive. Have students draw a dream house with beautiful landscaping. Have them share their pictures with the class. Materials: pictures of houses with and without landscaping, paper a to loops. Have students put them on the school tree or take them home to decorate their family tree. Materials: popcorn, berries or beads, thread, needles. Time: 40 minutes.

Activity 19: Students will gain an understanding of how plants are used in their everyday lives by making decorations out of plants. Students will draw a picture and glue macaroni, seeds or beans onto the picture. The picture can have a theme like a landscape, flower, food, or a picture of a plant, or it could be anything the students want to draw. Materials: Paper, glue, macaroni, seeds, or beans. Time: 40 minutes.

Activity 20: Students will gain an understanding of how plants are used in their everyday lives by making a display of different things plants can make. Have students look around their home for something they can bring in that comes from plants. In addition to all the things they have learned about, it might be fun to give them a list of unusual ideas such as a straw broom, rubber, cork, maple syrup, rope, paper, lotions and perfume. Set up a table at the back of the room or somewhere else where other students can see. Have students share their items and put them on the table. Have them make labels for their items that show the name of the item and what plant it came from. Materials: a table, tablecloth, paper for labels, tape to tape the labels onto the items, markers. Time: 30 minutes.

III. Plants in Other Cultures

Activity 21: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants and how they are used in other cultures by learning about the great Banyon tree. Read the book, In the Heart of the Village, by Barbara Bash. This is a story about a Banyon tree and what it gives to a village in India. Ask the children to name some of the things this tree does for the people. Have the students make a diorama of a banyon tree and something it does for the people. Use salt dough for a base. Stick small twigs in the dough for the banyon trunks. Green construction paper with green yarn glued on can represent the leaves. Students can use clay for objects in the diorama, and they can make small figures out of clay or foil. Materials: the book, In the Heart of the Village, by Barbara Bash, cardboard for a sturdy base, salt dough or clay to hold the sticks and for modeling other objects, construction paper, glue, foil, pictures of animals or people to glue on or other ideas you may want to add. Time: at least 1 hour. It might take two days to finish.

Activity 22: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants and how they are used in other cultures by studying Native Americans. Tell students, "In ancient times, some Native Americans of the northeast woodlands constructed wigwams as portable shelters. These shelters were either dome-shaped shelters or cone shaped. The cone shaped shelters looked like tepees of the Plains Indians, except that they were covered with bark, rather than skins. The Apache Indians called their cone shaped shelters "wickiups." The Abenaki referred to all their houses, no matter what the shape, as "wigwams." Wigwams were used during the days of hunting and gathering, before the first farmers and gardeners came into existence." Show several pictures of wigwams and give the students paper to draw their own wigwam. Make a bulletin board of a Native American village with their pictures. Materials: pictures of Native American wigwams and villages, paper, crayons. Time: 35 minutes.

Activity 23: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants and how they are used in other cultures by studying Native Americans. Students will make harvest necklaces using corn, bean, and squash seeds. The day before this activity, have students soak corn, bean, and squash seeds in water overnight. Food coloring can be added to the water to give the seeds color. Have students arrange 20-30 seeds into a pattern before stringing them. Because seeds can irritate the back of the neck, cut 6-8" pieces of heavy string for the backs of the necklaces. Tie one end of the string to the end of a thread about 18" long. The thread should be quilting thread, carpet thread or dental floss. Thread a needle onto the thread and let the students slide the seeds onto the thread. They will stop sliding when they get to the heavy string. You can make the necklace any length, but before knotting the thread to the other end of the heavy string, be sure it fits over the head. Materials: heavy string, strong thread, needles, corn, beans, and squash seeds. Time: 45 minutes.

Activity 24: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants and how they are used in other cultures by learning about a desert cactus. Watch the Reading Rainbow video #62 entitled, Desert Giant-Saguaro Cactus. This is a story by Barbara Bash and read by Phillip Bosco. It takes viewers to the beautiful landscape of Arizona's Sonoran Desert to discover mysteries of the majestic saguaro cactus. This helps the students understand the importance of this cactus to the people and animals of the desert. Students will also meet a "snake man" who lives in the desert. After the movie students can draw a saguaro cactus. Real sand can be added to the picture by brushing glue onto the paper and putting sand on the glue. When the pictures are dry, dump the excess sand into a container or into the garbage. Materials: Reading Rainbow video #62 from the Edith Bowen Library, video machine, paper, crayons, glue, sand. Time: 40 minutes.

Activity 25: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants and how they are used in other cultures by studying Africa. Give the students some background information on Africa; discuss climate, customs, etc. Show students pictures of African villages and ask them if they can see anything that plants were used for (shelter). Give students a picture of a hut on heavy paper. Take students outside to find small sticks and grass, or have straw and other materials available to them. Have the students cut out their hut leaving at least a 2" strip at the bottom. Glue the sticks and grasses onto the paper to make their own model. Fold the bottom so that it stands on its own. Materials: Heavy paper with huts copied onto them or let them draw their own, glue, small sticks, straw, grass, or other building materials. Time: 45 minutes.

Activity 26: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants and how they are used in other cultures by studying Africa. Explain to the students how the people of East African are known for weaving straw mats with beautiful designs on them. If you can find pictures, show these to the students. Have students weave their own mat by cutting colorful strips of construction paper and weaving them into patterns of their own. Remind students that paper comes from trees. Each student needs to choose two or more colors of construction paper and cut them into 1"strips. One paper needs to be cut lengthwise and the other one width-wise. The paper that is cut lengthwise should not be cut completely across, but cut until they are about 1" from the edge. Then they weave the shorter strips of other colors over and under creating a pattern. The next strip needs to be done opposite the first using an under then over pattern. As each strip is woven it needs to be secured with a stapler or tape to keep the mat from coming apart as the student weaves. Materials: At least two colors of construction paper for each child, scissors, tape or stapler. Time: 30 minutes.

Activity 27: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants and how they are used in other cultures by studying Japan. Read the story, How My Parents Learned to Eat, by Ina R. Friedman. Show a map or globe to the students and help them find Japan. Ask the students what the difference is between the way we eat and the way they eat in Japan? Many chopsticks are made of wood. You can buy inexpensive chopsticks in a supermarket or ask a restaurant to donate some. Invite several parents who know how to use chopsticks to come in and help on the day of this lesson. Explain how rice is a large part of the Japanese diet. Give each child a dish of sticky rice and chopsticks with which to practice. Remind them that it isn't easy to learn to use chopsticks. This is just a chance to try different eating utensils. Make it a fun experience, not a chore. Materials: the book, How My Parents Learned to Eat, by Ina R. Friedman, parent volunteers, chopsticks and rice. Time: 45 minutes.

Activity 28: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants and how they are used in other cultures by learning about a tree found in the Amazon rainforest. Locate the Amazon rainforest on a map. There are similar forests in Africa, New Guinea, and Indonesia. Read The Great Kapok Tree, by Lynne Cherry. This is a story of a man who walks into a rain forest to chop down a Kapok tree. He becomes tired and falls asleep under the tree. While he sleeps, the animals whisper messages to him about the importance of the tree. When he wakes, he sees the forest as a valuable resource. Talk about the story and why the rain forest is important to us. Have students act out the story. Materials: the book The Great Kapok Tree, by Lynne Cherry, any props you want to bring. Time: 30-40 minutes.

Activity 29: This activity will help students gain an understanding of plants and how they are used in other cultures by learning about the Aborigines in Australia. Have students divide into small groups. Give groups pictures and information about the plants used in that part of the world. Explain the information if they need help understanding it. Have each group talk about the plant and its uses. Then have groups come up with a skit to show how the plant is used. Let them present the skit to the class and see if the other students can guess how the plant is used. Materials: information for groups can be found at http://155.187.10.12/aborig.s.e.aust/s.e.a.mapkey.html. There are 19 plant pictures and their uses featured at this site. Time: 40 minutes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LESSON PLANS

 

Learning about peanut butter

Where did your lunch come from?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. LEARNING ABOUT PEANUT BUTTER

Objective:

Students will be able to identify where peanut butter comes from and how it is made by learning about and making peanut butter.

 

Materials:

Prepare peanut butter chant, peanut butter book, The Life and Times of a Peanut by Charles Micucci or From Peanuts to Peanut Butter by Melvin Berger, 1 lb. of roasted, salted peanuts in shells, food processor, crackers, plastic knives, paper plates, napkins.

 

Procedures:

1. Have the students wash their hands and come sit on the rug.

2. Teach the peanut butter chant to them. This can be repeated if the children want to.

3. Read the story to the children. Discuss the peanut plant and talk about the part of the plant the peanut grows on. Discuss the process outlined in the book. Ask students how they like to eat peanut butter, (on a sandwich, with crackers, on celery, in cookies).

4. Put the peanuts along both sides of a long table and let the students crack them. Have them put the shelled peanuts on plates. When plates start to fill, have students bring them to the processor and dump them in.

5. After all the peanuts are shelled, have students clean up the shells.

6. Set crackers and knives out and let the students spread the fresh peanut butter onto their crackers.

7. They can take the crackers to their seats and eat them.

8. While students are eating their crackers, review the facts from the book about the peanut, how it grows and how it is made into peanut butter.

 

Accommodations:

Students could be paired to help students that need help.

 

Evaluation:

This could be a group discussion while students are eating their crackers and peanut butter. Facts from the book could be reviewed and questions could be asked.

 

Peanut Butter Chant

First you take the peanuts and you smash em

you smash em, you smash em, smash em, smash em.

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Then you take the wheat and you grind it

you grind it, you grind it, grind it, grind it

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Then you take the bread and you bake it

you bake it, you bake it, bake it, bake it.

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Then you take the berries and you squash em,

you squash em, you squash em, squash em, squash em,

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Then you take the bread and you spread em,

you spread em, you spread em, spread em, spread em,

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Then you take the sandwich and you eat it,

you eat it, you eat it, eat it, eat it,

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

YA!

 

2. WHERE DID YOUR LUNCH COME FROM?

 

Objective: Students will be able to identify where the food in their lunch comes from by sorting the foods into a Venn diagram divided into plants/animals/ plants and animals.

 

Materials: Sample lunch for an example (include items from plants like fruit, some from animals like milk, and some from both like a turkey sandwich or chicken nuggets), empty Venn diagrams for students, a large Venn diagram drawn on butcher paper and labeled hed by Modern Curriculum Press, 1990).

 

Procedures:

1. Have the students sit on the rug.

2. Ask the children if they have ever wondered where their lunches come from. Listen to responses. Ask, "Before the cooks made it" or, "Before it went to the store." When they can't think of any more responses, say, "Let's read this book and see if we can find out!"

3. Read the story to the children.

4. Put the large diagram up and explain the different areas of the Venn diagram.

5. Bring out the sample lunch. Show each item to the children and ask if they can tell you where each item

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Then you take the wheat and you grind it

you grind it, you grind it, grind it, grind it

Peanut, peanut butter, jelly.

Peanut, p>

you grind it, you grind it, grind it, grind it

11. When they are at their seat, give them a diagram and let them write and/or draw the items from their own lunch on their own diagram. Let them color their diagrams.

 

Accommodations: Students could be paired to help students that need help.

 

Evaluation: The Venn diagrams that students create will tell you if they understand the concept.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CULMINATING ACTIVITIES

 

1) Have a breakfast at the beginning of the day. Use decorations they have made from the unit. Serve pancakes, margarine, maple syrup and orange juice to celebrate plants and all the things they give us to eat. Serve the food on paper plates Invite the parents to come share the celebration. Have the students tell the parents which plant each item comes from.

2) As groups, make collages of many different ways plants help us. Cut out pictures from newspapers and magazines. Let each group explain their collages to the class. Display them in the halls prior to parent teacher conferences so the parents will be able to see them.

3) Have a celebration where students do a small report as a group or individually. They can draw pictures, and write about their favorite plant or plants and why. Invite parents the day the students share their reports.

4) Have the children set up a display in the hall or somewhere everyone will see it. Have them put plants and products from plants that are helpful to us. Use the projects they have done during the unit for the display, also.

5) Ask a member of the DUP (Daughters of the Utah Pioneers) to come in costume and share how plants were a big part of the early pioneers' lives. Plants were used for food, shelter, medicines, decorations, toys, jewelry, dyes for

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

 

References:

 

Bash, Barbara. Desert Giant. Sierra Club Books. 1989.

 

Bash, Barbara. Desert Giant. Sierra Club Books. 1989.

Beautiful story of how the cactus helps the desert people. Reading Rainbow tape available # 62.

 

Bash, Barbara. In the Heart of the Village. Sierra Club Books. 1996.

Story of what a banyon tree gives to a village.

 

Berger, Melvin. From Peanuts to Peanut Butter. Newbridge Comm. 1996.

Great pictures of peanuts in the field and of the process of making peanut butter. Wonderful book!

 

Capaldi, Gina. Africa: Customs, Cultures, Legends and Lore. Good Apple. 1997.

This is an activity book with many hands on activities. It has several pictures of shelters and clothing made from plants. Also instruments, masks, and toys.

 

Cherry, Lynne. The Great Kapok Tree.

This is a story about the rainforest.

 

De Paola, Tomie. The Popcorn Book. Scholastic. 1978.

History and trivia about popcorn, Native Americans, Pilgrims, legends, and fun stories.

 

Eyewitness Books: Plant. Alfred Knopf. 1989.

Great reference book. Close up pictures of many plants and their uses.

 

Families Around the World. Evan-Moore Corp. 1991.

This is a workbook that has different ideas for children to see the many differences in families, clothing, homes, food, and schools.

 

Food Land and People.

 

Bash, Barbara. Desert Giant. Sierra Club Books. 1989.

 

Bash, Barbara. Desert Giant. Sierra Club Books. 1989.

 

Friedman, Ina R. How my Parents Learned to Eat.

> 

Gershator, David and Phillis. Bread is for Eating. Illustrated by Emma Shaw-Smith. Henry Holt & Co. 1995.

The story of bread for a little boy. It begins with planting wheat and ends with eating. Cute pictures.

 

 

Heller, Ruth. The Reason for a Flower. Scholastic. 1983.

This book shows many different kinds of seeds. It tells all about flowers.

 

Humphrey, Paul. Foods from Friends and Neighbors. Illustrated by Kareen Taylerson. Steck-Vaughn Co. 1995.

This book tells what foods are healthy and where they come from.

 

Dennee, Joanne, Peduzzi, Jack, Hand, Julia, Peduzzi, Carolyn. In the Three Sisters Garden: Native American stories and seasonal activities for the curious child.

This is a wonderful book full of games, activities, and stories having to do with the Native American culture.

 

Jensen, Ronald V., Living History Farm.

This is a farm located just outside Logan, Utah, and is part of Utah State University. This is a great field trip for students. In the fall, students can press apples into cider and shuck corn. In the spring, there are baby animals to see. The cost is $2.00 per student. Contact the farm at 435-797-1143.

 

Margurita, Rudolph. How a Shirt Grew in the Field.

The story of cotton.

 

Micucci, Charles. The Life and Times of the Peanut. Houghton Mifflin Co. 1997.

Great story about peanuts. Shows the whole process of growing and processing peanuts into peanut butter.

 

Mitgutsch, Ali. From Fruit to Jam.

From Tree to Table.

From Wood to Paper.

From Cotton to Pants.

From Beet to Sugar.

From Cocoa Bean to Chocolate.

These are all books published by Carolrhoda Books Inc. 1981. They are perfect for this unit! They are short stories with lots of pictures and simple text.

 

Walker, C. H. Food from Plants. Illustrated by Miranda Whitford. Modern Curriculum Press. 1990.

This is a "Big Book" and has great pictures and easy words. Includes a wide variety of plants.