Opening Doors To Social Studies With Children's Literature

Book Title: Flight

Author: Robert Burleigh

Publisher and Date: Philomel Books, 1991

Curriculum Developer: Michele B. Bowden

Summary: "Flight. Loneliness. Fear. Danger. The courage to Dream. Charles Lindbergh did not know he would ever see Paris when he left Long Island early that morning in May 1927. However, he did know that he had to try. He had a dream and he knew he had to make it real. He was just twenty-five years old.

People thought he was foolish, too young to know better. No one before him had ever flown across the Atlantic Ocean alone without a stop. Why did this Lindbergh think he could? With no radio or parachute, and only two compasses and the stars to guide him, Lindbergh set off on his journey. The rest is History." (Burleigh, 1991)

Social Studies Relevance: This book will help students see the unfolding of the history of flight. The studying of the book will set the foundation of early flight transportation. Flight transportation can be studied through a research project that will include the students acquiring information from an area of their own interest of flight history.

Grade Level Focus: Fifth Grade

Relationship to Social Studies State Core: Utah State Core Standard 6050-01. The students will utilize a variety of speaking, listening, writing, reading, and citizenship/character skills in completing social studies activities. Utah State Core Standard 6050-02. The studies will analyze how the historical past of the Western Hemisphere influences the present.

Objectives: Students will utilize a variety of speaking, listening, reading, and citizenship/character skills in completing social studies activities.

Utah State Core Standard 6050-0101

Write a conclusion about an historical event in order to formulate an idea for present and future events.

Utah State Core Standard 6050-0102

Read and analyze simple charts or graphs used in social studies.

Utah State Core Standard 6050-0103

Create individually, or in a group, one or more of the following: newspapers, posters, poetry, bumper stickers, interviews, surveys, bulletin boards, stories, letter writing, diaries, dialogues, or songs.

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Opening Doors To Social Studies With Children's Literature

Second Book

Book Title: LINDBERGH

Author: Chris L. Demarest

Publisher and Date: Crown Publishers, Inc. 1993

Curriculum Director: Michele B. Bowden

Summary: When Charles Lindbergh was born in 1902, not a single airplane flew in the American sky. At the age of 25, when airplane technology was still in its infancy, Lindbergh designed, The Spirit of St. Louis and made the first non-stop flight from New York to Paris. His accomplishment - alone and in a tiny single-engine aircraft - captured the imaginations of people the world over. Charles Lindbergh was the person who was responsible for the spirit of the pioneering days of aviation.

Social Studies Relevance: This book will share the true spirit of a young boy who followed his dream. The book will describe the early life of Charles Lindbergh, one of the person's behind airplane technology and the beginning times of aviation. This book conveys the importance of following one's dreams. Who knows where those dreams will lead? Perhaps, the dream will start something that will effect or impact people all over the world.

Grade Level Focus: Fifth Grade

Relationship to Social Studies State Core: Utah State Core Standard 6050-02. The studies will analyze how the historical past of the Western Hemisphere influences the present. Utah State Core Standard 6050-03. Explain that the geographical features of places within the Western Hemisphere vary and contribute to their distinctiveness.

Objectives: Students will analyze how the historical past of the western hemisphere influences the present. Students will also explain the geographical features of places within the western hemisphere.

Utah State Core Standard 6050-0201

Outline the major historical events, people, wars, and documents that played a significant role in United States history from 1492 to present.

Utah State Core Standard 6050-0303

Identify on maps, the major land forms, elevations, physical regions, major rivers, and mountain chains of the Western Hemisphere.

Utah State Core Standard 6050-0304

Use maps to explain the geographic setting of historical and current events.

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Introduction: I have found in my experience of working with older grade students that they will engage themselves more into the learning process if they have a choice in the subject matter. The following theme that I'm developing is a strong interest of mine. I have not had the opportunity to get student input. However, the theme is large enough that students will have a choice once they are immersed in the topic of flight.

Title of Lesson: Flight introduction through literature.

Subject Area: History

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Date: 5/10/97

Objective: As a group, students will design and produce a time line of the history of flight. Students will develop a time line for the classroom.

Materials Needed: Butcher paper, construction paper, glue, markers, reference materials, literature books, encyclopedia, drawing paper, pencils, and a computer with a word processor and a printer.

Procedures: (What will you and the students be doing?)

  1. Get the students focused on learning. Begin by reading the book Flight by Robert Burleigh.
  2. Start a discussion with the students to find out what the students know about the history of flight. Ask open-ended questions that will encourage students to feel free to respond to.
  3. Some example questions might be: Why do you think I choose to read this book about Charles Lindbergh and not the Wright Brothers? (My reason is that the literature of these two biographies are short and easy to read aloud compared to the informational type books on the Wright Brothers). What has happened in the time frame before the time of Charles Lindbergh in reference to the history of flight? Establish in the discussion that many events or advances in the history of flight have been made to bring us to the current day.
  4. Students will be divided into groups and will be assigned or responsible for a specific time segment on the time line. Students will be held responsible for their own learning within the group. A handout will be provided for the students to record who is responsible for what events within their assigned time period. (Possible resources for this project would be major encyclopedia sets) The students will then research and collect data or information on the events in flight history that occurred during their specific time frame.
  5. Students will use the knowledge learned in the research, then use their own creativity to design the way they would like to display their information on the big time line that will be hung up in the classroom. Technology is a wonderful tool here. I would allow the children to use the computer if they wish. (Things they could get: pictures, type text, etc.)

Evaluation: (How will you be able to tell whether of not students have met the objective? What observable or measurable data will you have?)

  1. The finished time line of the history of flight hung up in the classroom.
  2. Each student can be assessed according to whether the student completes the time events to put on the classroom time line and the completeness of data collected by the responsible student within their assigned time period.

Form for the students to use for their individual assigned time periods.

Students' Names: __________________, __________________ , ________________,

_______________, _______________ ,_________________ ,__________________ .

Group Name: ___________________________________________

Time Period: ____________________________________________

Individual student responsible for assigned time period.

Name
Events

1. ______________________________________

________________________________________

2. ______________________________________

________________________________________

3.______________________________________

________________________________________

4. ______________________________________

________________________________________

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Lesson Plan

Title of Lesson: Charles Lindbergh's Flight Plan.

Subject Area: Literature. Chart the voyage or trip of a character in a book.

Grade Level: Fourth, Fifth Grade

Date: 5/13/97

Objective:

  1. Given the story, Lindbergh , students will write, illustrate, and chart on their personal map the experiences Charles Lindbergh had when he flew his transatlantic flight over the ocean in 1927.
  2. In small groups, students will create and design map symbols for assigned areas to use on the classroom map.

Materials Needed: Large classroom map of the different continent areas, i.e., U.S.A., Canada, Newfoundland, Ireland, Scotland, England, France, and Spain, markers, post-it pads, scissors, paper, and crayons. Individual maps of each continent for each student.

Procedures: What the purpose of this lesson is for and description of the activity or assignment, summarizing, and concluding the lesson.

  1. Read the book Lindbergh by Chris L. Demarest.
  2. Students will work in small groups to identify in sequential order the flight course of Charles Lindbergh in his first transatlantic flight.
  3. Each student will write and/or illustrate the flight itinerary Charles Lindbergh used in his 33( hour flight across the Atlantic Ocean on their own individual maps. (See appendix)
  4. Each group will create and design map symbols for the flight. The students will tape the map symbols on the large classroom map. Each group will explain what the symbols represent on the map.

Evaluation: (How will you be able to tell whether or not students have met the objective? What observable or measurable data will you have?)

  1. Written or illustrated individual map of students.
  2. Group presentation of their map symbols on the large classroom map.
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Lesson Plan

Title of Lesson: Famous People in Early Flight History

Subject Area: History of airplane pioneers.

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Date: 5/11/97

Objective: (What measurable or observable student responses will be a result of this lesson?)

Given the research, students will distinguish between the people who were first to play significant roles in the beginning of aviation. Students should recognize the importance of their contributions to aviation.

Wilbur & Orville Wright

Charles Lindbergh

Louis Beleriot

Amelia Earhart

Materials Needed: Other literature books or reference information that tell about Amelia Earhart, Louis Beleriot, the Wright Brothers, big pieces of butcher paper, four different colored markers, four pieces of 8 x 11 paper for each famous person.

Example to illustrate use of paper.

Procedures: (What will the students by doing?):

The purpose of this lesson is for students to be able to review information previously learned and add more knowledge by listening to stories or information about other famous people in early aviation history.

Read aloud to the students or have students read the stories of the famous people. After reading the information about the famous people, have the students engage in the Corners Activity. [Source: Molyneux, L. (1994). Cooperative Learning, Geography and Success. Canandaigua, NY: Trellis Books.]

Explanation of the Corners Strategy.

In the corners of the classroom, the students express opinions, think critically, and defend choices. This strategy encourages risk-taking, debate and examination of personal convictions.

  1. Determine an important issue, problem or idea. The issue should require students to think, ponder, analyze and interpret.
  2. Make four statements, generalizations or assumptions about the issue. Place statements in corners. Call students attention to them. Ask students to decide which statement they agree with most. Go to that corner. In pairs have students explain their reasoning and ideas. Share as a larger group. If group is too large break into smaller groups.
  3. Ask individual student from a group to explain group's reasoning.
  4. Does anyone change their view. What caused you to revise your answer?

Activity:

  1. Place the poster paper and 8 x 11 sheet of paper taped together in each corner of the room. Write each of the four famous people on one of the 8 x 11 papers. Also on each paper write the question, "What significant contribution did this person provide to the history of flight?"
  2. Tell the students go and stand in the corner of the room by the person they felt had the greatest impact on the beginning of aviation.
  3. Use a brain storming carousel strategy. Each group will need a different colored marker. Have one student be in charge of the writing in each group. Have each group list as many things as possible that they know about their famous person and flight. Give a gauged amount of time for the students to write down information that answers the question. What significant contribution did this person provide to the history of flight?. Then have them stop. All the writers stop. Then rotate clockwise to the next corner. Have the students add additional information that has not yet been recorded on each famous person. Continue this procedure until the students have rotated back to where they started. The students will need to choose five of the greatest contributions the person made that contributed to the early history of flight and have them explain their reasoning and ideas within their group for choosing their five contributions.
  4. Have one student share with the whole class their group's reasoning behind their opinions of their famous person.
  5. Does anyone change their view? What caused you to revise your answer?

Evaluation: (How will you be able to tell whether or not the students have met the objective? What observable or measurable date will you have?)

Students will be assessed as a group and not as an individual.

After all the groups have been able to share their responses, look at all the posters and see the contributions from each group with the use of the four different colored markers, students will have been able to distinguish between the four famous people and recognize their contributions to aviation.

As the teacher, move around, watch, and listen to the students to observe the individual responses. However, the writings on the butcher paper with the four different colored markers of the different groups responses will suggest whether or not the students have an understanding about a few of the famous people in the beginning of flight.

 

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Lesson Plan

Title of Lesson: Interview a person who was a young child during the beginning days of flight history.

Subject Area: Oral history, interpersonal communication skills.

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Date: 5/12/97

Objectives: Given an oral and written history interview with a senior citizen, the students will summarize the information from the interview using some quotes. Students will include how the advancement of technology has changed over time during the years of early flight and now. Students will also include how the advancement of technology has improved and changed the life of the person they interviewed and their own life.

Materials Needed: Notebooks, pencils, pens, tape recorders. A must situation!!! Make sure students have a safe environment in which they can accomplish this project.

Procedures:

  1. Identify the topic - Early flight and the changes that have happened in the 94 year time period.
  2. Identify people they could interview. Great grandparents, grandparents, older relatives, neighbors, etc..
  3. Identify what questions that will be asked during the interview. Have the class generate questions that would be appropriate to ask.

Important side note: Teach students about good interviewing skills. Teach them about good follow up questions. For example, Why do you think that happened? Tell me more about the time when you were younger.

Remind the students that it is very important when doing oral history to make sure the tape recorder is working and that the sound can be heard. Also, explain the importance of using proper interpersonal skills and conduct the survey when it is convenient with the person you are going to interview.

  1. In pairs, the students will conduct the interview and restate the oral history questions giving them practice interview situations to ask the questions, operate the tape recorder, and use their listening skills.
  2. Students will write a written report on the information obtained in the interview. Students should use their creativity to add to the report of how the technology of life has changed the life of the person they interviewed and their own life. Students will be able to recognize that by conducting the oral interview, we all create history. History is not something that happens way out there far away from us. Oral history is a way to get the perspectives of many different people who were alive when certain events or changes occurred in our society.

Evaluation: (How will you be able to tell whether or not students have met the objective? What observable or measurable data will you have?)

  1. Given the oral history interview, students will write a report on the information they obtained from the person they interviewed. The report should include personal insight on the advancement of technology in the history of flight. Students can add their own personal thoughts about the interview and/or the advancements in technology in their own personal life relating to flight.
  2. Students will present report in an oral presentation in the classroom.
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APPENDIX

MAP - In the "Lindburgh," inside the front cover and the back cover, there is a map of Charles Lindburgh's flight over the Atlantic Ocean. During his thirty plus hour flight, Charles kept a detailed record of the things that happened during his flight. He recorded things in his journal that he wanted people to know about his journey in case he didn't make it. Charles Lindburgh's experiences were retold in this book. It is possible to use any map of the eastern coastline of the United States and Europe. However, I thought that a big blown up map and a small map of the one in the book would be really good for this lesson.