Title of Lesson: Egyptian Society


Objective:

~Students will make body cut-outs out of butcher paper dressed to represent the seven different economical statuses of Egyptian society. Peasant, craftsman, overseer, scribe, member of royal family, Pharaoh's son, and the Pharaoh.

~Students will write "a day in the life" paper about their assigned socioeconomic status. They will be able to answer questions about: what their person does during a day, where they live, what work they do, their families, and what kind of power they have, if any.

Materials Needed:

Procedures:

1. Ask the students if there are any physical characteristics of people that let us know their economic status. What types of things would you look for to know if someone were middle class, lower class or upper class. (Example: cars, clothing, jewelry etc.) Tell students that the Egyptians also had ways of seeing where people were economically. Their way was more obvious to everyone. There are seven different statuses and each one had a particular dress and hairstyle that let everyone know who you were and what you did for a living.

2. Students will be put into groups of four or five. Have students count off 1-7, have all the ones get to together and so on. There will be seven groups of four to five. Smaller groups are also fine, depending on how many students there are. Each group will be assigned an economic status to research. The seven statuses are: Peasant, craftsman, overseer, scribe, member of royal family, Pharaoh's son, and the Pharaoh.

3. Each group will need to research their economic status. Tell them to look for what their person does during a day, where they live, what work they do, their families, what kind of power they have, if any. what the person wore, and how their hair looked. Let the groups go to the library to research and also have books available in the classroom. A good book that shows pictures of each status is called Pyramids of Ancient Egypt, a living history series.

4. After students have researched their person, have them trace one of their bodies onto the butcher paper. Using the information they found on their economic status students will dress their paper cut-out body. Use yarn to make the hairstyle if they had hair and use the extra paper to finish their attire. Markers can be used to make the faces, put makeup on and color the staffs some carried.

5. When the body cut out is all finished have the students write a short story illustrating a life in the day of their person, this may be done as a group. Tell about what their person did during a day, where they lived, what kind of work they did, did they have families, and what kind of powers they had? Each group will read their short story to the class and show their cut out body. These bodies can then be hung around the room so everyone may see them as we do our unit. The stories will also be hung by the body so anyone can read it and find out what duties that person had to do in Egyptian Society.

Evaluation:

Examine the body cut outs and listen to the groups read their short stories. Look to make sure the groups covered the questions addressed in the objective about "a day in the life" of their person. Observe the groups as they work to make sure everyone is participating.


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