Dealing with Differences


Subject Area(s): Social Studies

Grade Level: 1-2

Date: 6 May 1997

 

Objectives:

1. During class discussion, students, as a whole group, will list at least ten things they have a hard time doing.

2. After reading and discussing Be Good to Eddie Lee, the students, in cooperative groups, will write at least six ways people can treat or assist people with disabilities.

 

Materials Needed:

book, Be Good to Eddie Lee, by Virginia Fleming

chart paper

markers

Venn Diagram

paper

pencils

computers with word processors

poster-size paper

 

Procedures:

1. Tell the students some things the teacher has difficulty doing. Ask them what things they struggle to do. Write their responses on chart paper. (Accept all answers.) If children cannot list at least ten difficulties, use leading questions to prompt them.

2. Ask the children, "What is a disability?" Help them define it as something about the mind or body that makes it hard or impossible to do some normal-life things.

3. Read Be Good to Eddie Lee aloud.

4. Ask the children why Christy and JimBud didn't want to play with Eddie Lee. Ask them what makes Eddie Lee different from the other children.

5. Fill in the Venn Diagram as a class.

6. Have the children brainstorm good ways that they can treat or assist people with disabilities. Record responses on chart paper.

7. Divide the children into four cooperative groups. Assign individual roles within the group:

group leader: guides discussion, keeps group members on task

materials gatherer: gets needed materials

recorder: writes down group notes and/or finished products

computer specialist: types paper(s)

reporter: gets information from or asks questions of teacher/other groups, turns in final product

Divide the more literate children evenly between the groups.

8. Each group will complete one of the following activities.

a. Make a flyer outlining six or more ways children can treat or assist people with disabilities to distribute to the other classes in the school.

b. Make a flyer outlining six or more ways children or adults can treat or assist people with disabilities to send home to parents.

c. Make a poster or bulletin board for the classroom, outlining six or more ways the students can treat or assist people with disabilities.

d. Write a letter to the local newspaper, outlining six or more ways the local citizens can treat or assist people with disabilities.

* Example ideas for projects:

Find out what they like to do and do it with them.

Sit by them on the school bus.

Ask before doing something for them.

Talk to them in a friendly, polite way.

Be their friend.

Change activities or games so that everyone can participate.

Let them help you, too.

* Children should, if possible, use a word processor for activities a, b and d.

 

Evaluation:

As the children list things they have a hard time doing, assure that they have at least ten.

To assess the second objective, check children's finished group projects to see that at least six ideas are listed.

 

Note: This activity can be done using any book that addresses relationships between people with and without disabilities. The teacher should choose a book most appropriate for his/her class and adapt the lesson. Some possible books are listed in the additional literature section.

 

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