Title: Grandpa's Fight and the U. S. Government

Objectives:
1) Given the United States Constitution, students will generate a list on the board of Grandpa's constitutional rights that might help him keep his home and property.
2) Students will become "experts," by reading and group discussion, on one of the 3 branches of the U.S. Government, and will teach class members from other groups what they learned.
3) Students will be able to correctly answer 8 of 9 questions on a quiz about the U. S. government.

Materials: Classroom or Media Center set of encyclopedias, a poster of the United States Constitution or any other copy of the constitution (see appendix), and social studies textbook, reference books (see book list), quiz (see appendix)

Procedures:
1) Teacher directs reading of selected parts of the constitutiond(see appendix). After reading, teacher asks, "What is stated in this Constitution that may help Grandpa keep his land?" and "Are any of Grandpa's constitutional rights being violated?--Which?" Generate a list on the board of anything students feel belongs.
2) Teacher explains that the U.S. Government is made up of 3 main parts or branches: Executive, Legislative, and Judicial. Explain that each child is going to have the opportunity to become an expert on one of the branches.
3) Give Instructions for a jigsaw BEFORE separating students into groups to avoid chaos. Instructions could go as follows: "I am going to separate you into 3 groups. Each group will be given one of the 3 branches of the U.S. Government as their topic. As a group you will find out exactly what responsibilities your branch has, who makes up your branch, and any interesting facts you can find. You are responsible to make sure that you know the information well enough to teach it, so make sure you are contributing to the group."
4) Separate students into 3 groups and assign each group one of the branches of the U.S. Government. Have available encyclopedias and social studies textbooks for students to look in to find information.
5) In their groups, students talk about what they're learning. Students can take notes if it helps them. If done in two days, let the expert groups meet one more time to help refresh each other's memories.
6) Now students teach each other! Separate students into groups again, with an expert from each branch of the governments in the group. Students teach each other about their branch. Students should be able to give a 3-5 minute lesson on their branch.
7) Students take the quiz.

Evaluation:
1) Visually observe the list students generate on the board to see if they understand Grandpa's constitutional right.

2) Observe students as they share information within groups about the branch of government they were an expert on.

3) Give students the quiz found in the appendix.

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