Revolutionary

War

Thematic Unit for fifth grade

Created by Jennifer Griffin

completed as part of the requirements for El Ed 4050

Fall semester, 1999, Jay Monson, course instructor, USU

For more information regarding unit: e-mail slr9c@cc.usu.edu

Table of Contents:

1. Significance of the topic

2. A sample introductory lesson plan

3. A great resource for this unit is American History Simulation by 1993 Teacher Created Materials Inc.

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Significance of the topic:

Social Studies course description - fifth grade:
The students will be introduced to a study of people and their ability to use past experiences to improve their way of life on a state, national, and international level. Emphasis will be to expand listing, speaking, reading, writing, and citizenship/character skills to a higher level of proficiency. Historical, geographical, political, and economic concepts will comprise the Utah core.

Utah Core standard 1:

-The students will utilize a variety of speaking, listening, writing, reading, and citizenship/character skills in completing social studies activities.
* Individually or in a group, create one or more of the following:
Newspapers, posters, bumper stickers, interviews, surveys, bulletin boards, stories, letter writing, diaries, dialogues, or songs.

Utah Core standard 2:

-The students will analyze how the historical past of the Western Hemisphere influences the present.
* Analyze the effects that the United States Constitution and Declaration of Independence have on the lives of the students.

Utah Core standard 3:

-The students will analyze the basic functions of government at the national level.
* Identify the major values in the Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, and Constitution.

 

The Revolutionary War meets the Utah Core standards and it is important for the students to learn about our country's history. They need to know and understand how our country was formed. The Revolutionary War was one of the many turning points in United State's independence.

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 Introductory Activity Lesson Plan

KWL

Objectives:

  • Students will explain what they know about the Revolutionary War.
  • Students will express what they wonder about the Revolutionary War.

Materials:

  • Katie's Trunk by Ann Turner
  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • Notebook paper for each student

Motivation:

1. Reading Katie's Trunk:
  • Begin by introducing Katie's Trunk.
  • Have the students write down three questions that they have about the book.
  • Have two students volunteer to read their questions.
  • Read the book and ask the students to write at least three more questions about the book. Also ask them to pay attention to the time period.
  • After reading the book, have the students write down three more questions about the book.
    • What will happen next?
  • Discuss the questions the students had during and at the end of the book.
    • Describe what you think will happen.
    • Tell me how you would have reacted if you were in her shoes.

Method:

1. KWL:
  • Have students get out a piece of notebook paper.
  • Have them fold their paper into fours
  • Individually: What they know section.
    • Have them write in the first square, what they know about the Revolutionary War.
    • Give them 1 minute and they need at least 5 things.
  • As a group: (the recorder is the top left for groups of 4 or the end person in groups of 3)
    • Have them use the back side of the first square
    • The recorder will write what they all know about the Revolutionary War. The things they had in common or were like (Oh, I know that!).
    • Give them 5 minutes
    • When the group is finished, the recorders will come to the board and neatly write their commonalties on the board under their group name.
  • As a class:
    • Look at the different comments and find the common things they all know about the Revolutionary War.
    • Put on chart paper
  • Individually: What they wonder.
    • Have them write in the second square, what they wonder about the Revolutionary War.
    • Give them 1 minute. They must have at least 5 things.
  • As a group: (the recorder is the upper right-hand person in groups of 4 or the right person in groups of 3)
    • Have them use the back side of the second square
    • The recorder will write what the group wonders about the Revolutionary War. Or if when someone is commenting they go, Oh I have that same question.
    • Each person in the group should read their questions. When someone has a common one, the other group member should say.
    • Give them 5 minutes
    • When the group is finished, the recorders will come to the board and neatly write their commonalties under their group name.
  • As a class:
    • Look at the different questions and find the common questions they have about the Revolutionary War.
    • Put on the same chart paper as what they know.

Check up:

  • Every student should have questions and comments on a piece of paper. The paper will make them accountable for their work.
  • Walk around the room, check for understanding, and make sure everyone is working together.
  • The groups are accountable by having to write their comments or questions on the board under the group name.

Assessment: (for the teacher)

  • How successful were you?
  • Did you achieve our objectives?
  • Did we learn something?
  • Was it interesting?

What would I change for next time?

 

 

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