The Effects of Pollution!

A Unit for 3rd Graders

 

 

 

By Annie Gillman and Paige Murray

 

Table of Contents

 

Overview and Rationale

Teacher Background Information

Unit Activity Bank

Organization and Subject Overview

Classroom Plan

Unit Planning Chart

Lesson Plans

Assessment

Appendix

 

 

Overview and Rationale

 

            This unit on the effects of pollution is designed for the use of 3rd graders.  Among many other topics, pollution is listed as a social justice issue and one of its many strengths is that it is closely linked to the science curriculum.  As teachers we believe that Social Studies is the building block of learning.  Our underlying goal throughout this unit is to equip our students with the knowledge and skills necessary to be productive active citizens.  It is important that we allow our students to become informed and prepared on issues such as pollution and teach them that they are capable of making a difference.  By understanding pollution and the effects it has on ones environment, students will more likely be able to make correct judgments and decisions about ways to reduce pollution. 

I believe that students can make a difference in the future if they are able to understand pollution and how it effects their environment.  Students must come to understand the role that they play in society and the effects they have on their world.  The National Council for the Social Studies says that teachers must prepare students to explore the causes, consequences, and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b). Pollution is a huge social justice issue that is ongoing and if not discussed among students, then the environment as we know will continue to get worse.  It is important that students understand the causes of pollution and be able to take a stand on the issue. 

The Utah State Core for the third grade focuses on how human activity influences the environment and community (Utah 6030-01).  Children need to understand that humans are responsible for the amount of pollution put in our society everyday.  It is important to teach children that they have a choice to make a difference.  Through proper actions and choices, such as recycling and limiting their needs, students can create an environment that is a cleaner and a safer place to live.  It is important for children to realize that it is they, who can make the difference. 

Many times, children do not speak out because they were never taught to do so.  In the Utah State Core for the third grade standards, it focuses on students participating in activities that promote good citizenship (Utah 6030-05).  Throughout the unit on the effects of pollution, each individual lesson provides the students with the opportunity to understand what pollution is and a variety of ways to help cut back on the pollution rate.  It is important for children to recognize that they have a voice.  By becoming an active member in their community, they can make a huge difference and influence others to do the same.

 By making the unit on pollution meaningful and relevant to the student’s lives, they will be able to see the value and the need for reducing pollution.  Teaching children the importance of recycling and promoting participation in the community offers children the opportunity to take responsibility and think more critically of their own actions.  This unit provides many options for students to become informed and involved citizens on the effects of pollution and possible solutions to the increasing problem.

 

Teacher Background Information

 

 In order to effectively teach this unit on pollution, teachers need to be knowledgeable about many different issues concerning pollution.  First of all, it is very important that teachers become aware of their students background knowledge in order to gain an understanding of what the students may already know concerning pollution.  Our unit provides KWL charts and brainstorming activities to help teachers learn about student’s background knowledge. The teacher needs to become familiar with their students cultures and communities to get a better idea whether pollution is a concern. For example, students who live in large cities will be more impacted by pollution than a student from a rural community.  It is important the teacher becomes familiar with the communities recycling standards and rules.  Many communities can only recycle certain items and the teacher need to be knowledgeable about what is recyclable in that particular area and what is not.  Utah for example can only recycle plastic bottles labeled #1. We found recycling information for this unit on our local dumpsters and on our county’s recycling web page (cvcleanteam.org).  It is important that you conduct your own personal research in order to give students reliable information concerning pollution in their surrounding community.

It is very important that teachers have an underlying definition of what pollution is.  Pollution is to make impure; to contaminate an environment especially with human made waste.   This definition should be used throughout the entire unit in order to guide the teacher’s focus.  It is also necessary to understand that pollution is comprised of many different categories.  For the sake of this unit we have chosen to elaborate on air, water, ground, and noise pollution.  Air pollution is defined as the bad air we breathe in.  Air pollution is found in both indoors and outdoors.  Human activities can release substances into the air, some of which can cause problems for humans, plants, and animals. Ground pollution is the trash and other material that seeps into the Earths surface.  Water pollution occurs when a body of water is affected due to the addition of large amounts of materials put into the water.  When it is unfit for its intended use, water is considered polluted.   Noise pollution is unwanted or offensive sounds that unreasonably intrude into our daily activities.  Each of these pollutants has an effect on our life and on our environment.  Teachers need to be aware of the consequences of pollution in order to effectively teach week 2 of this unit.  Some causes consist of health effects such as skin rash, asthma, kidney damage, cough, bronchitis, liver damage, throat and eye irritation, heart problems, headache, miscarriages, dizziness, birth defects, and cancer.  Other effects of pollution are overflowing landfills that cause detrimental effects on the environment, disturbing noises from airplanes and other loud objects that can cause learning imparities, breakdown of our ozone layer, and death to animal life of all kinds. 

Our last 2 weeks of our unit focuses on how we can prevent pollution.  Students will need to be informed about ways that they can help become active citizens by reducing pollution.  As we stated earlier recycling can greatly reduce the effects of pollution. As a teacher you should know how students could cut back on items such as paper, plastic bags, and nearly everything that they use within the classroom.  Teachers also need to inform students that they really can make a difference by limiting their needs and by recycling.

Some resources that teachers may find helpful while learning more about pollution are:

 

 Book by Chris Van Allsburg entitled Just A Dream

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ http://www.epa.gov/region07/programs/artd/air/quality/health.htm

http://www.alupro.org.uk/

http://www.lbl.gov/Education/ELSI/pollution-main.html

http://www.umich.edu/~gs265/society/waterpollution.htm

 

           

Unit Activity Bank

 

Unit Issue:  “What are the Effects of Pollution?”

Outcomes/Unit Goals: Explore cause consequences and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b).

Teacher Resources:

  • Utah.gov
  • Pollution reports
  • Adult books of pollution and affects
  • Recycling guides
  • Read alouds: Just A Dream  by Chris Van Allsburg
  • Brochures
  • Websites on pollution

Accommodations for Learners:

  • Buddies
  • Books in Native Language about pollution
  • Read along tapes
  • Group work
  • Parent supervision/volunteers
  • Allow more time
  • Shorter lengths of assignments

Field Trips/Guests:

  • Go to dump
  • Go to recycling centers
  • USU professors
  • Garbage man
  • Scientists
  • People from other cultures
  • Parents
  • Environmentalists
  • Mountains/community to pick up trash

Student Reading/Literature:

  • Textbooks (Social Studies/Science)
  • National Geographic
  • Websites
  • Just A Dream
  • Other story books on pollution

Oral Language:

  • Students tell stories and experiences
  • Sing
  • Poetry
  • Announcements

Written Language:

  • Letters to the newspaper/school
  • Letters to the editor
  • Poems
  • Songs
  • Campaigns
  • Stories
  • Journal entries

Social Skills:

  • Group Work
  • Pair Share
  • Presentations
  • Debates

Social Studies:

  • What is pollution?
  • How does it affect our environment?
  • How has technology changed our environment?
  • How does our population affect pollution?
  • What are the statistics of pollution in Cache valley?
  • How does recycling reduce pollution?
  • How can we reduce pollution?
  • What are different kinds of pollution?

Art:

  • Posters
  • Collages
  • Brochures
  • Book illustrations
  • Draw pictures about what the world would look like if we didn’t throw away garbage.

Music:

  • “Take out the paper and the trash” revised.
  • Songs about our world/America
  • Songs about nature/mountains/communities

Science:

  • Environmental effects
  • What are the different kinds of pollution?
  • How does this affect our ozone layer?
  • How does this affect our water?
  • Medical repercussions
  • How much trash do we put in our world?

Math:

  • Statistics
  • Computing averages
  • Reading charts/graphs

Physical Education/Movement Health:

·        How does pollution affect our physical and mental health.

·        What are the causes of swimming/drinking polluted water

·        How does it affect animal’s health and survival?

Technology:

  • Go to websites on pollution
  • Watch videos

Culminating Activities/Unit Projects:

  • Create school recycling project
  • Create a video
  • Create a big book
  • Put on a play
  • Make brochures
  • Set up a campaign
  • Art work

Assessment:

  • Peer assessment review
  • Read journals
  • Reflect on lesson plans and make modifications
  • Use a rubric
  • Observe same students and record actions
  • Tests
  • KWL chart understanding
  • Have students explain and respond

 

 

Organization and Subject Overview with Goals and Objectives

           

The overall question of the unit is:  “What are the effects of pollution?”  This unit will address three NCSS strands for performance expectations of students:  1) Explore causes, consequences, and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); 2) Identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); 3) Identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b). In addition to using the National Standards, we have implemented the Utah National Core Standards as well.  They include:1) Students show how environments and communities change over time through the influence of people (Utah 6030-01).  2) Students participate in activities that promote good citizenship (Utah 6030-02). The content of our unit is organized thematically into three main categories.  The three issues that we address are: “What is Pollution?,” “ What are the Effects of Pollution?,” and “How can we Prevent Pollution?”.  All of the activities that are applicable for these three headings are listed in our Unit Planning Chart below. The students will benefit from each of the lessons because we have made it a priority to make them meaningful in our student’s lives. The lessons and activities included in the unit deal with real-life problems that the students face in their communities and in their lives. Throughout the use of literature, our students will be able to take on a different perspective of what our world might become if the persistent problem of pollution is not controlled.  Students are also able to have an authentic experience as we discuss the different health effects that pollution may cause.  They are able to confront their feelings towards pollutants as we read a real-life obituary of someone who has been greatly affected by pollution.  We also have provided many activities to engage students and motivate them to make a difference.  Students will understand the importance of their actions on their environment by performing a skit to their peers about the benefits of being active members in their community and taking a stand by recycling. Classroom projects will also allow students to recognize ways that they can be more frugal in their use of paper and other classroom supplies. This allows students to recognize the ways that they contribute to pollution and how they can reduce the effects that they cause by conserving. Not only are students learning for the time being by participating in such activities, but also they will learn valuable information that will benefit them in their futures. 

As teachers it is very important that we have a block of time each day dedicated to the Social Studies.  We feel that social studies is a broad subject that integrates all aspects of the curriculum.  It is important that students become aware of the issues that surround them in their everyday lives.  Because of this, each of our lessons take up a minimum of 45 minutes each day.  The lessons are comprised of activities that deal with group work, class discussions, and individual problem solving to help students become more aware of the effects of pollution.  We involve categorizing, acting, decision-making, class recycling projects, and literature to emphasize the main issues discussed throughout the unit.  The students will be collecting materials throughout the classroom so they need to be readily available to use.  Space should be allotted for students to bring in materials that they have collected to be used or recycled.  This space should be away from the traffic areas of the classroom.  It is important that the desks are arranged in groups of four to six in order to make group activities easier to manage. Resources such as books, pictures, videos, magazines, and websites should be available for students to read and research their developing interests in pollution.  The classroom plan below indicates the classroom set-up that would be ideal for this unit.

 

 

Classroom Plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit Planning Chart

 

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

TOPIC

 What is Pollution?

What are the Effects
Pollution?

How can we Prevent Pollution?

How can we Prevent Pollution?

NCSS
STANDARDS

• Explore cause consequences and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues
such as pollution (NCSS 9d)
• Identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical
environment (NCSS 8b).
• Identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b).

UTAH
 OBJECTIVE

• Students participate in activities that promote good citizenship (Utah 6030-05).
• Students will predict how human activity will influence environments and communities (Utah 6030-0101).
• Students discuss possible solutions to pollution and identify how environments and communities change over time through
  the influence of people (Utah 6030-01).

LEARNING
ACTIVITIES

 KWL Chart about their
knowledge of pollution.

Guest speaker on the effects of
pollutants on health.

Perform a skit about preventing
pollution to inform peers.

Take a field trip to the local
recycling center.

 

 

Literature read aloud on
pollution. 

Brainstorm possible effects of
pollutants

Learn about recycling

Sing song "Take Out the
the Trash"

 

 

Students predict future
pollution problems

Discuss obituaries of people
who have died from pollutants

Students determine what can be
recycled

Create a poem

 

 

Students write their own
pollution story

Students write about ways that
people could avoid pollutants

Class recycling project to
determine if paper is reusable

Bring things from home to
Recycle

 

 

Take a field trip to the local
dump

Brochures of the effects of
pollutants on health

Write a letter to a pollutant to
explain how to get rid of him

Create a video to encourage
recycling

 

 

Categorize pictures into
correct pollutant heading.

Research the internet for further
information (inquiry based)

 Letters to the governor about
 the importance of recycling

Create a big book as
a class to put in school library

 

 

Students create a collage
on pollution

Visit a place where the
environment has been effected

Classroom campaign to clean
up the playground

Make a class oath to always
help prevent pollution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plans

Lesson 1

 

Title of Lesson:  What is Pollution?

Teachers:  Annie Gillman and Paige Murray

Date: 8/30/03

Time Allotted: 45 minutes

Grade Levels: 3rd

Number of learners: 30

Unit Theme:  The Effects of Pollution

Standards Met: See Below

Goal:  Explore cause consequences and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b).

Objectives:  Given [materials], the learners will contribute to part of the KWL chart about pollution, they will listen to a read aloud about how pollution can affect our future, and continue adding to the KWL chart, in order to predict how human activity will influence environment and communities (Utah 6030-0101).

Material Needed: Just A Dream by Chris Van Allsburg, KWL Chart on butcher paper, markers.

Motivation:  It made me so mad today as I drove to school.  I saw the man in the car next to me throw out his wrapper from his McDonalds breakfast sandwich. I couldn’t believe it!!  How many of you have seen someone throw their trash somewhere besides a garbage can?  Well, today we are going to find out about what happens when we don’t take care of our world.

Procedures:  (This is a teacher student interactive activity.  A KWL chart will be placed in front of the class ahead of time.  As students respond, teacher will fill in the chart. )

  1. With the ‘K’ part of the KWL chart, ask students “What do you know about pollution?” Write student responses on the chart.
    1. To cue students responses ask:

                                                               i.       Is there pollution in Logan?

                                                             ii.       What causes pollution?

                                                            iii.      What kinds of things can be polluted (i.e. air, ground, water, noise)

                                                           iv.      What are ways that people pollute?

  1. In order to fill out the ‘W’ part of the KWL chart, ask students “What do you want to learn about pollution?”  Write student responses.
  2. Read aloud Just a Dream, stopping to explain any new vocabulary, student’s questions/experiences, and elaborate on illustrations.
  3. After reading the book, fill in the ‘L’ category by asking students, “After reading Just A Dream, what kinds of things did you learn about pollution?”  Did the book answer any of your questions?  If we don’t help reduce pollution what consequences will we face in the future?
  4. Leave the chart up for display and explain to the students that we will continue to add to it as we learn more about pollution.

Accommodations:  For second language learners, provide versions of the read-aloud book along with a cassette tape to follow along with.  Invite students to sit up front providing a closer view, better hearing, and to encourage on-task behavior. 

Closure:  At the end of this book, the little boy plants a tree.  What can you do that would contribute to reducing pollution in our world? Have 5 students share their ideas with the class.

Assessment/Evaluation:  Review the KWL chart to evaluate student’s knowledge and progress concerning pollution.  (This is a good starting point for the teacher to see what the students already know about pollution and what they need to learn).  

  Extension: Have students tell a story about when they (or someone they know) have caused pollution or helped to prevent it. 

Teacher Reflection:

 

Lesson 2

 

Title of Lesson: Student’s Just a Dream

Teachers: Annie Gillman and Paige Murray

Date: 9/30/03

Time Allotted: 45 minutes

Grade Level: 3rd

Number of Learners: 30

Unit Theme: The Effects of Pollution

Standards Met: See Below

Goal: Explore cause consequences and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b).

Objectives: Given [materials] students will be able to recognize human actions that affect our environment and create a class book with a drawing and explanation of a time where they saw how human activity influences the environment through pollution in order to understand the potential effects of pollution (Utah 6030-0101).

Materials Needed: Pieces of paper for each student including extras for mistakes (blank on top, lined on bottom), pencils, markers, crayons, and student dictionaries.

Motivation: Review the story Just A Dream, by Chris Van Allsburg. Explain to students that we are going to make our own Just a Dream book as a class throughout the unit.

Procedures:

  1. Model directions by drawing a piece of paper on the white board (blank on top and lined on bottom).  Remind the students about the incident that you saw happen on your way to school.  Tell them that you are going to make a page in the class book about the man who was a litterbug. 
  2. Then, on the blank part of the paper, draw what you saw.  On the lined portion, write about it.  Such as: “I saw a man crinkle up his wrapper and throw it out the window of his car.”
  3. Explain to the students that they will be doing the same thing about a time when they witnessed pollution.
  4. Hand out to each student a piece of paper (blank on top, lined on bottom).  Provide them with writing and drawing materials.
  5. Give students adequate time to make their drawings and write their story.

Accommodations: Give students extra time, allow them to write in their native language (with a translation), or require a small written description. Allow students to ask for help or work with a buddy.

Closure:  After students have finished their page, ask several students to share their pictures and responses.  Give a round of applause for student’s good work.

Assessment/Evaluation: Have student’s hand in their pictures and written description that they created for the class book concerning pollution. Evaluate them for understanding and awareness of what pollution means through their illustrations and writings.

Extension:  For students that get done early, have them create the cover page to the class book. 

Teacher Reflection:

 

Lesson 3

 

Title of Lesson:  What Pollutant am I?

Teachers:  Annie Gillman and Paige Murray

Date:  10/06/03

Time Allotted: 30-45 minutes

Grade Level:  3rd

Number of Learners:  30

Unit Theme:  The Effects of Pollution

Standards Met:  See below

Goal:  Explore cause consequences and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b).

Objectives:  Given [materials] students will be able to identify and categorize the four different pollutants by looking at pictures, in order to describe the changes of the environment due to human inventions and peoples influence over time (Utah 6030-0101).

Materials Needed: For each table, provide 8 to 10 different pictures showing examples of water, air, ground, and noise pollution.  Include category headings entitled AIR POLLUTION, GROUND POLLUTION, WATER POLLUTION, and NOISE POLLUTION.  The teacher should also have the same label headings on the white board for class categorization. You will also need a glass of water and food coloring.

Motivation:  Bring in a glass of water that has been discolored with food coloring and ask one of the students if they would like to have a drink.  Once they say no, ask them why not.  Tell them that the water and the air that they drink and breathe have many different chemicals and pollutants, but unlike the food coloring, they cannot see it.

Procedures:

  1. Review with students, what it means to pollute.
  2. Ask students questions about polluting.
    1. How does pollution affect our environment?
    2. What are examples of everyday things we use or do that promote pollution?

                                                               i.      Inventions: Drive cars, airplanes, throw away trash, hairspray, chemicals, loud noises, insecticides, fertilizers ( Review of earlier lessons)

  1. Explain to the students about the four kinds of pollutants they will be studying for this unit.
    1. Air, ground, water, and noise pollution.
    2. Air pollution is the bad air we breathe in.  Air pollution is found in both indoors and outdoors.  Human activities can release substances into the air, some of which can cause problems for humans, plants, and animals.
    3. Ground pollution is the trash and other material that seeps into the Earths surface.
    4. Water pollution occurs when a body of water is affected due to the addition of large amounts of materials put into the water.  When it is unfit for its intended use, water is considered polluted. 
    5. Noise pollution is unwanted or offensive sounds that unreasonably intrude into our daily activities.
  2. Ask the students a time when they have seen any of these four pollutants.
    1. What are some examples of the various pollutants?
    2. Where do we see these kinds of pollution taking place?
    3. How do humans play a part in these various types of pollutions?
  3. Next tell the students that they are going to play a game about pollutants.  Tell the students that you want to see how well they understand each of the four categories of pollutants.  Remind them that they are going to have to use their thinking skills for this game. 
  4. On the students table place a box of several pictures and four headings (many different   pictures of pollution and headings entitled: air pollution, noise pollution, ground pollution, and water pollution).  Place the headings at the top of the table. 
  5. Mix up the pictures and categorize them into their correct type of pollutant.
  6. Give the students eight minutes to complete the task.
  7. After the students are finished, have them bring up their categorized pictures to the whiteboard to create a classroom chart. 
  8. This is a good way for students to see all of the different forms of pollution that were placed on their peers tables.

Accommodations: For students that may have a difficult time understanding the pictures you could have a written explanation of what is depicting on the back of the picture. 

Closure: Have the students look closely to all of the pictures on the board and ask them whether or not they want these types of things in the world around them.

Ask the class to “take a stand” on the following statement: “I feel that my personal actions make a difference in creating solutions to pollution.”  Students will line up according to their personal beliefs that their actions make a BIG difference (one end of the classroom) or a VERY LITTLE difference (the opposite end of the classroom).  This is a great introduction to pollution prevention that follows later in the unit.

Assessment:  Observe the students categories of different pollutants to see if they can place various pictures under the correct pollutant heading. Ask the groups to each tell about a different picture and give a verbal description why it fits into the category that it does. Such as, “This picture is under the water pollution heading because of all of the trash that people have thrown in the river.”

Extension:  Have the students write about a time when they have seen any of these different kinds of pollution in their lives and share them with their groups.

 Teacher Reflection:

 

Lesson 4

 

Title of Lesson: Polluted Health

Teachers: Annie Gillman and Paige Murray

Date: 9/30/03

Time Allotted: 45 min-1 hour

Grade Level: 3rd

Number of Learners: 30

Unit Theme: The Effects of Pollution              

Standards Met: See Below

Goal: Explore cause consequences and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b).

Objectives: Given [materials], students will learn how human activity will influence communities and the environments (Utah 6030-0101). Students will contribute to the brainstorming web about polluted health.  Learners will be able to learn about different degrees of health problems that arise from pollution.  Students will compose a reversed obituary in order to understand how to prevent getting ill

Materials Needed: Obituary from the newspaper, a pre-written reversed obituary.

Motivation:  Begin coughing and say that you have a soar throat from breathing in all of the dirty air outside. 

Procedures:

  1. Ask students how pollutants can affect their health?  Can these affects be serious to our bodies?
  2. Explain to the students that as a class they are going to do a brainstorming web about the effects of pollution on health.  “What are some health problems that people face?”

Write student responses on the board as a web.  (Skin Rashes, Asthma, Kidney Damage, Liver Damage, Can’t Breath, Coughing, Bronchitis, Headaches, Heart problems, Dizziness, Throat and Eye Irritation, Damage to the inside of the Body, Baby Problems, Birth Defects, Cancer).

  1. Respond to and clarify any questions that students have about the effects of pollution on health.
  2. Explain to the students that there are a variety of health issues that range from less serious to more serious. 
  3. Next to the web, create a new chart and label the headings accordingly:  Less serious, Medium, and More serious.
  4. Ask the students to categorize the health affects from the web into the correct column. Possible answers include:

Less Serious                                  Medium                      More Serious

Skin Rash                                             Asthma                             Kidney Damage

Cough                                                  Bronchitis                         Liver Damage

Throat and Eye Irritation                                                               Heart Problems

Headache                                                                                     Miscarriages

Dizziness                                                                                      Birth Defects

                                                                                                    Cancer

  1. Explain to the students that over 1.3 million people die in the world from pollutants each year.  Ask the students how that makes them feel.  Why do we continue polluting our world?
  2. Read an obituary of someone who passed away from a pollutant. 
  3. Explain to the students that they are going to help write the reverse of an obituary.  Tell the students come up with solutions of how that person could have avoided or reduced the effects of the pollutant on his/her health.  Begin by brainstorming possible ideas of ways to avoid pollutants.  Make a class web on the whiteboard.
  4. In their groups, students will write their reversed obituary. Students need to include the pollutant and the prevention strategies that the person may have taken.
    1. Example:  On October 10, 2003 Miss Paige Murray escaped the detrimental effects of drinking polluted water by buying a water filter and by having her neighborhood contact the state about their water conditions.

Accommodations: Have students work with partners. Provide a format of an obituary for students to fill in their responses.

Closure: Volunteers share their obituaries with the rest of the class.  Review with the students what are ways that we can reduce pollution in order to stop all of these deaths.

Assessment/Evaluation: Read students reversed obituaries to evaluate students understanding of possible solutions to prevent illnesses caused by pollution.  Look for student’s description of specific pollutants and their consequences on their health.

Extension: Provide newspapers for students to look through and find a person who passed away from pollutants.

Teacher Reflection:

 

Lesson 5

 

Title of Lesson: The Recycling Skit!

Teachers: Annie Gillman and Paige Murray

Date: 9/30/03

Time Allotted:  Two-hour session

Grade Level: 3rd

Number of Learners: 30

Unit Theme: The Effects of Pollution

Standards Met:  See Below

Goal: Explore cause consequences and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b).

Objectives:  Students will be able to reenact a skit of the importance of recycling in order to participate in activities that promote good citizenship (Utah 6030-05).  Students will predict how human activity will influence environments and communities (Utah 6030-0101).

Materials needed:  30 copies of the Family Recycling Project script.  A prepared list of groups with assigned characters for each student. 

Motivation:  How many of you have seen a skit?  Has anyone ever been part of a skit?  Well today you get the chance to become actors and actresses.

Procedures: 

  1. Divide the class into groups of nine, one for each character. (Depending on class size, characters may need to be added)
  2. When students have been placed in their groups, give students their assigned characters.
  3. Have the groups read aloud the script in Readers Theatre format to become familiar with their parts.  In Reader’s Theatre, students take a turn reading their individual parts out loud as a script (Allow time for practice and numerous run-throughs).
  4. Assign students to practice their skits at home as homework.
  5. In the second 1-hour session, students will perform their skits to other classes in the school.  (Arrangements should be made with other teachers ahead of time).

Accommodations:  Modify the script to make lines simpler.

Closure:  Tell students that you are proud of their skits and that their efforts made a difference.  Ask students other ways that they can promote recycling.

Assessment/Evaluation:  Observe students’ motivation and participation while working with their groups.  Have the students write in their journals and describe how it felt to promote recycling, and if they felt that they made a difference among their peers.

 

Extension:  Perform skits in front of parents.

Teacher Reflection:

THE FAMILY RECYCLING PROJECT SKIT CAST

1) Mother - 42 years old, Mrs. Linda Green, Engineer

2) Father - 42 years old, Mr. Ken Green, Teacher

3) Teenager - 16 years old, Maria Green

4) Elementary school-age child - 8 years old, Joseph Green

5) Neighbor - Mrs. Gray

6) Relative - Aunt Alice, from New Jersey

7) Grandparent - Grandma (or Grandpa) 70 years old

8) Dawn (Maria's friend) - 16 years old

9) Narrator

Background Information:

MOTHER: Mrs. Green works as an engineer. She works hard at her job because she wants her family to have things. She leaves home about 7 a.m. each day and returns about 6 p.m. She commutes to her job.

FATHER: Mr. Green works as a teacher. He leaves home about 7:30 a.m. and returns about 3:30 p.m. Then he starts to cook dinner and do other household chores.

MARIA: High School student. Very popular. Does well in school?

JOSEPH: Fourth grade student. Very interested in the environment, which he is now learning about in school.

GRANDMOTHER: Born in 1918. She has seen many changes. When she was born, there was no TV or radio and almost no one owned a car.

THE FAMILY RECYCLING PROJECT SKIT

NARRATOR: The play begins with Mr. & Mrs. Green, Maria, and Joseph sitting around the table eating dinner.

MR. GREEN: What did you do in school today, Joseph?

JOSEPH: Well, we learned about garbage, Dad.

MR. GREEN: Garbage? Are you kidding? I don't think that's a subject for the dinner table, Joseph.

JOSEPH: Oh, but it is. Mrs. Driscoll says each person makes 3-4 pounds of garbage everyday. For homework she told us to make a list of some of the things in our garbage.

MARIA: I don't make four pounds of garbage a day.

JOSEPH: Mrs. Driscoll says teenagers make more than four pounds of garbage a day.

MARIA: I don't believe that. I'll bet you make more garbage than I do.

JOSEPH: Bet I don't.

MRS. GREEN: Why don't you have a contest to see who can make the least amount of garbage in a week?

JOSEPH: We could all do it.

JOSEPH: Could we Dad? Could we? I could write about it and get extra credit.

MR. GREEN: Well, OK, but just for a week.

MRS. GREEN: I suggest that instead of a contest we make it a family project. OK? Let's separate things that get thrown out from things that could be reduced, re-used, or recycled.

JOSEPH: That will reduce the amount of trash that goes to the landfill, Mom!

MRS. GREEN: Is everyone agreed?

EVERYONE: "OK"

NARRATOR: It's now a quarter to seven in the morning. Maria and Joseph are eating breakfast.

JOSEPH: Now remember, Maria, newspaper in one pile, then there are cans for deposit, no-deposit cans, bottles for deposit, no-deposit bottles, food scraps, plastic...

MARIA: I can't remember all that. Who cares about garbage anyway? I'm too busy.

JOSEPH: It's important, Maria. If we don't do something about the garbage, we're going to have serious problems.

MARIA: Like what?

JOSEPH: For one thing, we won't have any place to put it! For another, it really hurts the water.

MARIA: That's not my problem. Is it?

MRS. GREEN: Hey kids - it's getting late. Joseph your lunch is on the counter.

JOSEPH: But Mom, you used plastic. Plastic is not recyclable.

MRS. GREEN: Joseph, what should we do?

JOSEPH: Maybe I'll save this clean plastic bag and re-use it tomorrow.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

NARRATOR: It is now evening. Grandmother, Aunt Alice (from Richmond), and a neighbor have come to visit.

AUNT ALICE: I hear you folks are going on a garbage diet.

MRS. GREEN: Yes, but its so much extra work.

GRANDMOTHER: Well, this might surprise you, but when I was a child we had no garbage at all.

MARIA: No garbage? How come Grandma?

GRANDMOTHER: Well, there was just about no plastic at all, and bottles and cans were pretty scarce too.

MRS. GREEN: What about spoiled leftovers or scraps? Who collected that?

GRANDMA: Well no one did. We just put it in a compost pile.

NEIGHBOR: I've got one of those. I just throw the food in a bin in the corner of my backyard. Then later, I put it on my flowers. Sure makes them grow.

MRS. GREEN: I don't want a smelly pile of food rotting in my backyard.

NEIGHBOR: It doesn't smell as long as someone remembers to "TURN" it with a shovel every month, or more often if you have time.

MARIA: But that's work!

GRANDMA: Well, Maria, most worthwhile things do involve some work. But the work has to be shared. For example, your parent’s work away from home all day so it might be up to the rest of you to help out.

NEIGHBOR: Here in our community recycling is easy. All you need are two pails. One for things that can be recycled, the other for things that cannot.

MARIA: But Grandma, what did you do with all the packages after the food was all gone?

GRANDMA: Well, there were almost no packages.

JOSEPH: You must have starved!

GRANDMA: It wasn't as easy to get food as it is now, but we managed.

MARIA: What did you do?

GRANDMA: Well, just about everyone grew a lot of food in the backyard. Then we cooked the food and stored them in special jars. That's called "canning." Just about everyone had a canning closet full of food that they hoped would last a long time. Potatoes, turnips, carrots, and sweet potatoes were kept in the basement. No plastic bags, no metal cans, no cardboard boxes.

MRS. GREEN: And no food in February.

GRANDMA: Oh, it rarely got that bad, but it's like anything else...there are advantages and disadvantages to having packages.

JOSEPH: Weren't there stores when you were young Grandma?

GRANDMA: Oh there were stores, but you had to bring your own container in which to take the food home. Or, the store gave you a container, which you had to give back later.

AUNT ALICE: It seems to me that people in cities have more garbage problems than in other places.

MRS. GREEN: That's because our drinking water is under the ground. When garbage is thrown out on the ground, any parts that dissolve can go into the water if not properly managed.

MARIA: But that means we can never throw anything out!

MRS. GREEN: That's not as hard as it sounds, Maria. Take that old radio you threw away this morning.

MARIA: Oh, that radio was broken, Mom.

GRANDMA: Yes, but I'll bet your school has a course in electricity.

MARIA: Why didn't I think of that? They could probably have fixed it. But I don't want that radio anyway.

GRANDMA: Yes, but there are people who don't have any radio at all. I'll bet they'd be happy to get a fixed-up old radio.

MARIA: How come you're so smart, Grandma?

JOSEPH: She's not smart, Maria. She's just old.

MR. GREEN: JOSEPH!

GRANDMA: Joseph is right. People learn by making mistakes. The older you are, the more mistakes you've made, and the more you've learned.

MR. GREEN: That's why we have recycling. It's as though everyone is saying, "we've made mistakes, but now we've learned." But even if we repair, recycle, and reduce, we still will have some garbage that will need to be incinerated or sent to a landfill.

GRANDMA:  What have you learned, Ken?

MR. GREEN: I was afraid you were going to ask me that. I've learned that going on a garbage diet isn't easy.

JOSEPH: But it's important. Right, Dad?

MR. GREEN:  Right, Joseph.

NEIGHBOR: It's not enough to talk about it. Everyone has to do something about it. Wouldn't it be great if every family went on a garbage diet?

MARIA: We would have the world's smallest garbage dump!

MRS. GREEN: And the cleanest water. Joseph has taught us that.

- - DOOR BELL RINGS - - ...

MRS. GREEN: Maria, it's your friend, Dawn.

DAWN: Hi, Maria. Want to go to the mall?

MARIA: OK, Dawn, but first I have to go through my garbage pail.

DAWN: Your garbage pail????

MARIA: Yes. I want to find an old radio I threw out this morning.

DAWN: OK, but some people are weird.

MARIA: It's not weird. You want clean water, don't you?

DAWN: Well, sure, I guess.

MARIA: Well it's not enough to talk about it. We have to do something about it.

MR. GREEN: We ALL have to do something about it.

* Adapted from, http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/class/edis/590s4/Miller/The_Garbage_Diet.htm

 Lesson 6

Title of Lesson: What can be Recycled?

Teachers: Annie Gillman and Paige Murray

Date: 9/30/03

Time Allotted: 45 min

Grade Level: 3rd

Number of Learners: 30

Unit Theme: Effects of Pollution

Standards Met: See Below

Goal: Explore cause consequences and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b).

Objectives: Students will be able to determine whether items can be recycled and why we recycle in order to participate in activities that promote good citizenship (Utah 6030-05)

Materials Needed: Category headings labeled Recycling and Non-Recycling, 30 copies of the Assessment sheet, and items that can be placed in categories.

Examples:

Recycling Column

  • Grass, leaves, straw, shrubs, and branches
  • All colors of glass except plate glass
  • Small sizes of ferrous metals
  • Clean aluminum cans
  • Rinsed and crushed #1 plastic bottle (remove lids)
  • Plastic milk jugs
  • Cardboard/Paperboard (cereal boxes)
  • Copy paper
  • Junk mail
  • Envelops
  • Colored paper
  • Books
  • School papers

Non-recycling Column

  • No bleach bottles
  • Food of any kind
  • Greasy boxes
  • Styrofoam
  • Pizza boxes
  • Aluminum/tinfoil
  • Pie tins
  • Plastic bags
  • Barb wire
  • Hazardous materials
  • Fast food containers
  • Used paper towels

 

 

Motivation:  Tell your students that you were cleaning your house yesterday and you were not sure whether some of the objects could be recycled, or whether they were biodegradable, and that you need their help in making the right decision.

Procedures:

1.      Hold up each item one at a time.  Give the students time to look, feel, and analyze the item presented.

2.      By a raise of hands, ask students “who thinks that this item should go in the recycling column?  Who thinks it should go in the non-recycling column?”  Place the item in the column where the majority thinks it belongs. (If students are having a hard time determining where the item belongs, guide them to make the correct choice.) Have one of the students from the majority explain why it belongs in that column.

3.      Have students get with a partner and discuss common attributes of the items in each column. 

4.      After students have discussed it with a partner have them share with the rest of the class what similarities they came up with. 

5.      Compare and contrast the students’ results between the recycling column and the non-recycling column.

6.      Ask the students why they think that it is so important to recycle items?  What does recycling do for our environment?

Accommodations: Allow students to work with a partner on the assessment.  Give students extra time to examine objects.

Closure: Ask the students, “What did we learn today about recycling?”  “What kinds of items need to be recycled?”  “What kinds of things can we recycle from our own classroom?”  “Why is recycling important?”

Assessment/Evaluation: Give students a copy of this list and have them write yes next to the items that can be recycled and no next to the items that cannot. 

 

ITEMS

YES/NO

Paper

 

Styrofoam

 

Wood

 

Glass

 

Barb wire

 

Milk jug

 

Apple

 

Leather Jacket

 

Pizza box

 

Extension:  Have the students write a note home to their parents explaining to them what items can and cannot be recycled in their community and why.

Teacher Reflection:

* For additional information go to http://www.cvcleanteam.org

 

Lesson 7

Title of Lesson: Is It Reusable?

Teachers: Annie Gillman and Paige Murray

Date: 9/30/03

Time Allotted: Continual

Grade Level: 3rd

Number of Learners: 30

Unit Theme: The Effects of Pollution

Standards Met: See below

Goal: Explore cause consequences and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b).

Objectives: Students will be able to suggest ways paper and other natural resources can be used and recycled in the classroom. Students will conduct a hands-on investigation into paper use and make distinctions among observations, conclusions (inferences), and predictions in order to promote good citizenship (Utah 6030-05).

Materials Needed:

1.      Waste paper generated in the classroom

2.      Two big boxes

3.      30 pencils

4.      Any of the following:

  • Grocery bag
  • Box
  • Zip-lock bag
  • Magazine
  • Gift wrap paper
  • Cards
  • Newspaper
  • Lunch bag
  • Milk carton

Motivation: Refer to the earlier exercise where students “took a Stand on pollution” and lined up in the room according to whether they thought that they could make a big difference in pollution or a little difference.  Tell them that they are going to have a chance to make a big difference in preventing pollution in the classroom.

Procedures:

  1. For one week ask students to save all waste paper generated by class activities.  Instead of having a regular garbage can, have two big boxes available.  Teach the students that all of the paper that has been completely (e.g. on both sides) used goes in one box and paper that and paper that could be used again goes in the other box  (Make sure to label the boxes).
  2. At the end of the week, compare the amount of paper in the boxes and lead a class discussion on "Are we wasting paper?"
  3. Divide the class into groups of four. Give each group some of the reusable paper, pencils, and one of these items: grocery bag, Ziplock bag, box, magazine, gift wrap paper, cards, newspaper, lunch bag, or milk carton. Ask each group to make a list on the reusable paper all the ways they can think of to reuse the item, or list alternatives to these items that could be used over and over again (e.g. reusable plastic containers instead of sandwich bags, thermos instead of milk carton, etc.).
  4.  After ten minutes, share the ideas. Do the exercise again with items that students use in the classroom.

Accommodations: Work with a buddy, guide students to know which box to put the paper in.

Closure: Tell the students that if they continue to reuse items instead of just throwing them away, they will be able to make a difference.

Assessment/Evaluation:  Have the student’s hand in their lists of all of the ways that they can reuse the item that they are given.  Look for an understanding of conservation ideas and realistic responses that can help prevent the use of unnecessary items.  Ask the students to respond in their daily journals what they think it means to “reuse.”

Extension:

  1. Maintain a room-recycling center throughout the year. Make gifts, models, table decorations, collages, bookmarks, and nametags, etc. out of the reusable paper. Take the items that have been completely used to a recycling bin.
  2.   Try making recycled holiday cards, creative writing paper, report covers, etc.
  3. Collaborate with other teachers to collect more items that can be recycled.

Teacher Reflection:

Adapted from:

http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/class/edis/590s4/Miller/Classroom_Conservation.htm

Lesson 8

Title of Lesson: Fighting A. Pollutant

Teachers: Annie Gillman and Paige Murray

Date: 9/30/03

Time Allotted: 45 min-1 hour

Grade Level: 3rd- 6th

Number of Learners: 30

Unit Theme: The Effects of Pollution

Standards Met: See Below

Goal: Explore cause consequences and possible solutions to persistent contemporary and emerging issues such as pollution (NCSS 9d); identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment (NCSS 8b); identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens (NCSS 10b).

Objectives:  Given [materials], the learners will consider what types of substances generated by humans could become environmental pollutants.  They will discuss possible solutions to pollution in order to identify how environments and communities change over time through the influence of people (Utah 6030-01). Students will also participate in activities that will promote good citizenship (Utah 6030-05).

Materials Needed: Trash to scatter around classroom, white board markers, the letter from A. Pollutant (overhead optional), paper and pencils for 30 students.

Motivation: Before the students enter the class, throw wads of paper, food containers, and other garbage around the room.  Use the mess around the room to stimulate a discussion about pollution.

Procedures:

  1. Ask the students:  “How do we get rid of what we don’t want?  Where does this waste end up?  What if this trash on the floor were actually an oil spill, toxic chemicals, or sewage?” “How do you think it could affect humans, animals, or plants?”  “What is called when we throw all of our trash out into the environment (pollute)?”  Give students the definitions of the word pollute which is: to make impure.  To contaminate an environment especially with human-made waste.
  2. With the entire class participating brainstorm a list of common substances, generated by humans that students think could adversely affect living things in the environment.  Ask the students:  “Where do you think the salt that is spread on the roads in the winter to melt the ice ends up?” “How do you think that it might affect all of the living things around us?”

Example:                                               Possible Pollutants

Wood preservatives      fertilizers           insecticides       sound   light     

Cigarette smoke           car exhaust       road salt           Paint    cleaning supplies            oil              smoke from business     smoke from campfires   sewage             medicines

           

  1. Ask the students if they can think of any effects that these pollutants might have on the environment?  Have you seen evidence of pollutants in nature?  What have you read or heard about any of these topics?
  2. Tell your students that you received a very disturbing letter in the mail yesterday that you want them to see.  You can put the letter on an overhead and have the class read along for literacy practice, play it on a tape, or read it to them) The letter reads:

 

 

To (Teacher’s Name) Class:

 

I’m A. Pollutant and I am here to say,

I affect your lives in many ways.

When you pass a landfill you say, “It stinks!”

But it’s your garbage-so what did you think?

 

When foul waters close beaches for a day,

You complain-but how did it get that way?

When skies are smoggy and hard to breathe,

You shake you head and blame it on me.

 

You humans think you’re so darn smart,

So why not accept the important part

That you folks play in making pollution-

Why, don’t you know that you’re the solution?

It’s not my fault; you create me,

If it weren’t for you, I just wouldn’t be.

 

To explore pollution, I have some advice,

First look at how I affect your life.

Without healthy people, life on Earth’s in trouble,

So investigate pollutants, on the double.

 

And please consider how I got here to start,

To prove that humans really can be smart.

If you do these things, I may start to fade away,

But not until you change the role you play.

 

R.S.V. P. (React Soon to Vile Pollutants),

A.     Pollutant

 

  1. Tell the students that we cannot put up with A. Pollutants sneery remarks.  We must fight back!  Have the students respond by writing a letter back to A. Pollutant telling him how you are going to help get rid of him (what things can we do to prevent pollution)?
  2. Have the students sit in the author’s chair and share their letters.

Accommodations: Provide extra definitions, extra time, extra help. Provide a letter template for them to use or have a scribe to write for them.

Closure:  After having a few students share their letters that they wrote to A. Pollutant, put the letters in a big envelop and address it to A. Pollutant.  Explain to them that the only way that we are going to actually get rid of him is if we stick to our word and fight back!

Assessment/Evaluation: Read the students letters and evaluate their concepts about preventing pollution.  Look for ideas such as reducing waste by recycling, picking up trash, being careful with chemicals, car-pooling, ride bikes, etc.

 

Extension: You could send the class letters to state officials.  You could also do a great extension with science by setting up an experiment of how many common pollutants can affect plants’ growth and development.

Teacher Reflection:

*Modified from Grow Lab; Activities for Growing Minds by National Gardening Association.

 

Assessment

            Assessment is an important tool that drives the curriculum.  It is more than just testing a student; it is the foundation for teaching and learning.  Assessment helps teachers to understand their students as well as critique themselves as teachers.  We suggest that the teacher should keep a clipboard with a list of all of the student’s names throughout the unit so that the teacher can keep track of which students have been called on and which students have not.  This is a helpful way to document students who seem to be grasping the ideas of pollution and those who may be struggling.  By using the clipboard, students will have an equal opportunity to be called on as well as be held accountable for participation. Each student should have an opportunity within the unit to meet with the teacher for a conference.  Students should be called back to meet with the teacher on an individual bases for at least 5 minutes throughout the unit.  The teacher should ask the student question concerning pollution to evaluate the students understanding of the concept.  When evaluating the students, teachers need to check for the understanding of pollution, the different kinds of pollution, where and what they are, how pollution effects our environment, and ways to reduce pollution. Conferencing also provides the student with the opportunity to ask any questions that he or she may have about the unit or other classroom issues.

Throughout the unit we have provided a variety of assessments that will help the teacher evaluate the students understanding of pollution.   We have also been very careful to provide authentic assessments that meet the needs of every student.  By using authentic assessment we allow students to participate and reflect on what they have learned about pollution. Assessment throughout our unit is ongoing and builds upon previous information.  This allows the teacher to evaluate the students’ progress and provide additional information if needed.  Ongoing assessment also helps the teacher to be reflective on ways that they could improve their unit and teaching strategies.   Some of these assessments included are: writing, drawing, discussing, evaluating, and small formal assessments.   

Unit Assessments:

·        After reading Chris Van Allsburg’s Just a Dream, review the KWL chart that the class created to evaluate student’s knowledge and progress concerning pollution, and the effects it can have on their environment. This is a good start to see what he children already know. 

·        Have student’s hand in their pictures and written description that they created for the class book concerning pollution. Evaluate them for understanding and awareness of what pollution means through their illustrations and writings.

·         Observe the students categories of different pollutants to see if they can place various pictures under the correct pollutant heading. Ask the groups to each  tell about a different picture and give a verbal description why it fits into the category that it does. Such as, “This picture is under the water pollution heading because of all of the trash that people have thrown in the river.”

·         Observe the students motivation and desire to participate in the fight against pollution.  Look for students who make suggestions, ask questions, and are on the strong side of “taking a stand” on the classroom continuum. Have students clarify why they chose to stand where they did.  Look for ideas related to recycling, health effects, and preserving our environment. 

·         Read students reversed obituaries to evaluate their understanding of possible solutions to prevent illnesses caused by pollution.  It is important that students really have an understanding of ways to prevent pollution, and express it sincerely in their reversed obituaries.  Look for students description of specific pollutants and their consequences on their health.

·        Observe students motivation and participation while working with their groups.  Have the students write in their journals and describe how it felt to promote recycling, and if they felt that they made a difference among their peers.

·         Give students a copy of the recycling list and have them write yes next to the items that can be recycled and no next to the items that cannot.  Check for correct answers.   

·        Have the students hand in their lists of all of the ways that they can reuse the item that they are given.  Look for an understanding of conservation ideas and realistic responses that can help prevent the use of unnecessary items.  Ask the students to respond in their daily journals what they think it means to “reuse.”  Look for students responses that suggest that to “reuse” means to take something and use it again.

·        Read the students letters to A. Pollutant and evaluate their concepts about preventing pollution.  Look for ideas such as reducing waste by recycling, picking up trash, being careful with chemicals, car-pooling, ride bikes, etc.

 

Appendices