Learning Activities Bank

Sample Lesson 1

Title of Lesson: “Journal Writing”

Teacher (s): Melissa Warner

Date: Oct. 10, 2003

Time Allotted: 1 hr.

Grade Level(s): 4rth grade  

Number of Learners: 30

 

Unit Theme:  “Why did the Mormon pioneers come to and settle in Utah?”

Standard(s) Met: (See below)

 

Goal:  NCSS Performance Expectations I c. Explain and give examples of how language, literature, the art, architecture, and other artifacts, traditions, beliefs, values and behaviors contribute to the development and transmission of culture

III g. Describe how people create places that reflect cultural values and ideals as they build neighborhoods, parks, shopping center, and the like;

V b. Analyze group and institutional influences on people, events and elements of culture

 

Objectives: Standard 4 Obj. 1 – Show appreciation for the uniqueness of other cultures – Demonstrate respect for cultural differences.

 

Materials Needed:

            I Walked to Zion By: Susan Arrington Madsen

            Any pioneer journals

            A journal for each student

 

Motivation:

-  Begin the class by reading to the students two to three pioneer journal entries and ask the class to identify what it is you are reading to them.

 

Procedures:

1.      Ask the students if any of them write in journals or if they know anyone who has or does write in a journal.

2.      Discuss reasons why people write in journals. Ask the students: Why do you write in a journal, or why does that someone you know write in a journal?

3.      Discuss how journals have become wealth’s of knowledge, how we have learned a lot about different historical events because of journals. Learn about examples of journals rich in history.

a.       The Diary of Anne Frank

b.      Pioneer journals etc.

4.      Compare and contrast journals and history books.

a.       Similarities – reports on historical events – gives times and dates – talk about location of events etc.

b.      Differences – Journals give personal and emotional responses to historical events – Journals main focus isn’t on dates – History books states facts etc.

5.      Discuss the unique perspectives that are in journals

a.       Journals are written more personally so have more emotional reactions and feelings

b.      Many times journals are very one sided and tell stories from a particular view

c.       Journals show how people lived and reacted to the world around them etc.

6.      Teach the unique features journals have.

a.       Day’s date when written

b.      Written in first person

c.       Non-fiction

d.      Gives details about a single day, or a single event

e.       Writer gives their personal feelings and emotions to the events of the day

7.      As a class write two journals entries about the last field trip you took, or any other event, each one from a different perspective. (e.g., the teacher vs. the students or tour guide vs. the cashier etc.) Talk about why the journal entries are different even though they are about the same event.

 

Accommodations:

-         For students who may have a hard time with the actual writing process the words they could use a word processor to type their journal entries

-         Student who have limited verbal skills could draw pictures from different perspectives about events as their journal entries

 

Closure:

1.      Have each student in the class write a journal entry about the previous day’s social studies lesson.

2.      In small groups have them share their entries with each other discussing the similarities and differences among the entries.

3.      Have a couple students share their entries with the entire class and as a class point out the different perspectives.

4.      Assign the students for the rest of the unit to write a journal entry each day in their journals on the topic, and from the perspective you will give them each day.

 

Assessment/Evaluation:  

-         To assess the student’s knowledge about journal writing and perspectives you can collect the journal entries they made during the lesson and look over them to make sure the students understood the lesson.

-         Throughout the unit you can periodically (weekly, biweekly etc.) collect and evaluate the journal entries to ensure the students are learning the material.

 

Extension:

-         Students could find and read published books that are journals.

-         Students could research and find pioneer journals either from their own ancestors or from any other sources.

 

Teacher Reflection: 

 

 

 

 

Sample Lesson 2

Title of Lesson: “A Street of My Own”

Teacher (s): Melissa Warner

Date: Sept. 29, 2003

Time Allotted: 1 ½ hrs.

Grade Level(s): Fourth Grade

Number of Learners: 30

 

Unit Theme: “Why did the Mormon pioneers come to and settle in Utah?”

Standard(s) Met: (See below)

 

Goal: NCSS Performance Expectations I c. Explain and give examples of how language, literature, the art, architecture, and other artifacts, traditions, beliefs, values and behaviors contribute to the development and transmission of culture

III g. Describe how people create places that reflect cultural values and ideals as they build neighborhoods, parks, shopping center, and the like;

V b. Analyze group and institutional influences on people, events and elements of culture

 

Objectives:  Utah Core Standard 2 Obj. 2 – Describe how various groups interact to create community roles and traditions - Standard 1 Obj. 1 - Identify factors that contributed to the development of the land

 

Materials Needed:

- Map of Nauvoo during the time the Mormons lived there

- Pictures of Nauvoo

- Pictures of different neighborhoods/streets with distinct differences

- White paper

- Pencils

- Markers, crayons, color pencils – whatever you want the students to draw with

Motivation:

- Begin by showing the students pictures of different neighborhoods/streets and talk about the features in each (kinds of buildings, stores, parks etc.) Ask students: “If you could pick to live in one of these areas which one would you pick and why would you pick it?”

 

Procedures:

1.      Enlarge the map of Nauvoo and as a class look at what the members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints included in this city they built from the ground up.

2.      Ask the students: “Why do you think they had a printing shop? A Cultural and Masonic hall? A lands and records office? Etc.” Discuss reasons as to why the members would have wanted these types of buildings and businesses in their city.

3.      Point out to the students how Nauvoo is set right on a river and discuss reasons as to why they would have chosen this location for their city.

4.      As a class make web/mind map of qualities, about Nauvoo the city, they like and dislike, and talk about what they would want to change if they could.

5.      Have each student make a web/mind map on what they would include on their “ideal” street if they could design a street in anyway they wanted.

6.      Each student will draw their “ideal” street using what they have listed on their web/mind map.

7.      Have each student then write up why they included each aspect of their “ideal” street.

 

Accommodations:

- For students who may have a hard time construction their own web/mind map they could be paired with another student and do it together

- If a student has difficulty writing, or cannot write they could orally tell the teacher why they included what they did on their street.

 

Closure:

- In small groups have the students share their “ideal” street and talk about what they included and why.

 

Assessment/Evaluation:  

- Collect the street and write ups and look over them to see that the students understood and it was relevant to them.

 

Extension:

- If students wanted they could research different cities and learn about where and why they were built. They could compare and contrast another city with their own city.

 

Teacher Reflection: 

 

 

 

 

Sample Lesson 3

Title of Lesson: Packing a Wagon for Utah

Teacher (s): Melissa Warner

Date: Oct. 10, 2003

Time Allotted: 50 – 60 minutes

Grade Level(s): Fourth Grade

Number of Learners: 30

 

Unit Theme: “Why did the Mormon pioneers come to and settle in Utah?”

Standard(s) Met: (See below)

 

Goal: NCSS Performance Expectations I c. Explain and give examples of how language, literature, the art, architecture, and other artifacts, traditions, beliefs, values and behaviors contribute to the development and transmission of culture

III g. Describe how people create places that reflect cultural values and ideals as they build neighborhoods, parks, shopping center, and the like;

V b. Analyze group and institutional influences on people, events and elements of culture

 

Objectives:  Utah State Core Standard 1 Obj. 2 – Identify the first settlers to Utah – Identify important historical sites and historical figures

Standard 2 Obj.1 – Determine reasons for immigration to Utah

 

Materials Needed:

- Suitcase with some traveling items

- “Packing Your Wagon Worksheet”

- Calculator

- Pencils

 

Motivation:

- On a table have an empty suitcase and items that you would pack for a trip (clothes, toothbrush, brush, books etc.) Begin by asking your students: “Have you ever packed to go on a trip? What kinds of things do you need to take with you?” Discuss these questions and “pack” your suitcase.

- Ask your students: “How would this “packing” be changed if you were moving far away and would never return to where you live now?

- Discuss how packing for a trip and packing to move away forever are different.

 

Procedures:

1.      Discuss as a class that this is what every Mormon pioneer that moved from Nauvoo to Utah had to do. They had to pack everything they wanted to take with them in a wagon and they would probably never see Nauvoo or their homes again.

2.      Ask: “What are some of the things you would have to take with you if you were making this type of a move?”

a.       Ask: “Were there stores along the trail for the pioneers or in Utah when the pioneers got here?”

            - Discuss how when the pioneers got to Utah there was nothing, and since there was nothing when they packed to move here they not only had to bring their clothes,              pictures etc., but they also needed to bring food, and supplies to start farms and a whole new life in Utah.

3.   Ask: “How did the pioneers get all these things to Utah? Were their planes, trains, boats?

                  a. Discuss with the class that everything the pioneers wanted to bring with them had to fit in a wagon and that the wagon could only carry 1,100 lbs. and each item weighed a                   certain amount

                              4.   Divide the class into “families” of five. (mother, father, sister, brother, baby)

                              5.   Give each “family” a copy of the “Packing Your Wagon Worksheet”

                              6.   Go through the worksheet together as a class and review how to work out the budget – not going over the amount of money you have.

                              7.   Explain that each family is to pack their wagons and prepare for the trip to Utah.

 

Accommodations:

- Group students struggling with math with those who can help them

 

Closure:

- Each group will share their list of items they are packing with the rest of the class

- Compare and contrast what each family brought ask: “Why did the list differ?”

 

Assessment/Evaluation:  

- While students are working rotate through the groups and make sure the math is correct

- Collect the worksheets and review what the students chose to bring

 

Extension:

- As a class pack a real handcart and pull it for a short distance

- Field Trip to the top of Immigration Canyon, notice where the pioneers had to bring their wagons

 

Teacher Reflection: 

 

 

 

 

Sample Lesson 4

Title of Lesson: “Persecution in History”

Teacher (s): Melissa Warner

Date: Oct. 15, 2003

Time Allotted: 45 min.

Grade Level(s): Fourth Grade

Number of Learners: 30

 

Unit Theme: “Why did the Mormon pioneers come to and settle in Utah?”

Standard(s) Met: (See below)

 

Goal: NCSS Performance Expectations I c. Explain and give examples of how language, literature, the art, architecture, and other artifacts, traditions, beliefs, values and behaviors contribute to the development and transmission of culture

III g. Describe how people create places that reflect cultural values and ideals as they build neighborhoods, parks, shopping center, and the like;

V b. Analyze group and institutional influences on people, events and elements of culture

 

Objectives:  Utah State Core Standard 4 Obj. 1 – Show appreciation for the uniqueness of other cultures – Demonstrate respect for cultural differences.

 

Materials Needed:

- Books about people who have been persecuted (See appendices)

- Picture of Davids Star

- Picture of the relocation camp at Topaz

 

Motivation:

- Show the class a picture of Davids Star. Ask: “Does anyone know what this is and its importance?”

            - Discuss the persecution the Jews received during World War II

- Show a picture of the Japanese Relocation Camp at Topaz and ask: “Does anyone know where this is or what it is?”

            - Discuss how during World War Two the Japanese were forced to leave their homes, primarily in California and move to Topaz, it Utah, and how this was persecution.

- Ask: “Does anyone know about any other groups of people who have been persecuted?”

            - Begin a KW chart on what students know about other groups who have been persecuted

 

Procedures:

1.      From the KW chart discuss as a class why this persecution took place.

a.       Ask: “Why do you think these groups received the persecution they did?”

b.      “Do you agree or disagree with the persecution they have received?”

c.       Other questions to guide the discussion of persecution

2.   Ask: “Is there anything you would want to know more about these other groups of people?”

      a. Fill in the W portion with what students want to know

3.  Introduce each book, about persecution you have gathered, by reading a couple of paragraphs from each to give the students a taste of the book

4. Discuss with your students how even though this unit is focusing on the Mormon pioneer’s persecution, there are many other examples of persecution throughout the world

5. Divide the class into groups of two or three

6. Each group will choose one group of people, who have been persecuted, they want to learn more about

 

Accommodations:

- Be sure to group your struggling students with students who will be able to help them

 

Closure:

- Students in groups will research another groups who has been persecuted and will develop a way to present the information they have found to the class. (Oral report, power point, painting(s) etc.

 

Assessment/Evaluation:  

- You can use the group presentations as an assessment tool

 

Extension:

- Students could read two literature books about two different groups persecutions and compare and contrast the two

- As a class visit the relocation camp at Topaz

 

Teacher Reflection: