Can We Have Unity in Our Classroom that represents a Nation of Immigrants?

Unit for 5th Graders

By Audrey Philpot

&

Jana Martinez

people holding hands dancing around a globe

www.cac.cc.az.us/TitleV

Table of Contents

 

Overview and Rationale

Teacher Background Information

Activity Bank Chart

Organization and Subject Matter Overview

(Goals and Objectives)

Unit Planning Chart

Assessment

Lesson Plans

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Lesson 7

Lesson 8

Appendix

 

Overview and Rationale

 

This unit on social justice issues is set up and designed for 5th grade curriculum.  Through our personal experience in schools and the community we believe that a goal must be met to have more unity in our country.  We want to make our students more aware of the multiple backgrounds and immigrants in our country.  We want our students to comprehend the reasons for immigration, some immigration was forced (slavery), other immigrants have fled to America as refugees, some seek a better life or to find their families. Like Walt Whitman said we are “not merely a nation, but a teeming nation of nations.” They will be able to apply their new knowledge and perspectives gained from this unit to our classroom directly. We plan to teach this unit early on in the school year because we want a community within our classroom. We want the students to respect one another and to be able to work together cooperatively. We feel that this unit can help build strength in the classroom for the entire year, as well as meet goals of the national and state standards.

 

I. Philosophy of Social Studies

We believe that the social studies topics we teach must be meaningful to us in order to pass their importance on to our learners. We feel it is our responsibility to meet the needs of all the learners in our classroom. We can meet these goals through multiple teaching methods that will more likely engage our students. Through integrating social studies with other subject areas we will build a community of learners that will be capable in contributing to societies demanding world. Through respecting the subject of social studies and the concerns of our individual learners we will create an atmosphere where children feel comfortable to share their views. Our learners will be capable of respecting those opinions and views that differ from their own.

            I

II. National Standards

            The National Council for the Social Studies defines this subject as "the integrated study of the social sciences and humanities to promote civic competence." They are a guide that can help unite education and society. We have used the NCSS standards in our unit to help our learners gain an understanding for the necessity of unity and acceptance in our diverse nation of today.

 

III. State Standards

            We have followed the Utah core in our lesson plans to prepare our students for the standardized tests that will be given. Although the Utah core is not as broad as the national core it is also a guideline for educators to follow. We have made our objectives in each lesson be directly from the Utah core.  We feel it is our duty and responsibility to give our learners the knowledge directed by their given grade level from the core.

 

IV. Appropriateness to particular grade level

            We have planned our unit to primarily focus on the fifth grade level.  However, through accommodations the lessons can be adapted for low level or higher level learners. The NCSS standards and the Utah core have helped to shape what we will be teaching through out the unit. To make this unit even more appropriate we will seek out the interests of our learners and make appropriate adjustments to get the class motivated and active in this unit.

 

V. Meaningful to the lives of the children

            We feel that having a sense of unity in our nation of immigrants will help our learners be more accepting of others through out their life. Acceptance and tolerance of others is a life skill needed in the work place as well as becoming a good citizen in your community. ‘Who can be an American,’ is something we want our students to think about and realize. There is no American specific race or ethnicity. We would like to eliminate generalizations and stereotypes like Ronald Takaki’s experience being an American with Asian ancestry, but having others assume he was a visitor in the U.S. who spoke excellent English, when in reality he was born in America.  We feel that this unit is meaningful to their lives because learners are being exposed everyday to diversity. If our learners can understand how to work with and respect people of all backgrounds our classroom will be unified, and our learners will carry this with them through out life.

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Teacher Background Information

 

The first thing a teacher needs to teach this unit is the belief that it is important to recognize differences in all people and appreciate diversity. The reason being is that your beliefs will not be hidden from your learners. Beware of implicit messages being taught.  The teacher will need to study immigration of their own self and personal background first. The unit first models how you got here and why others would want to come to America.  I (Audrey) have Italian heritage, I am here because my grandfather Finnochio wanted to be with his family who came over to America to be part of the dream. I (Jana) have Spanish heritage, I am here because my grandfather Martinez wanted a better life for his family. With our students we would go into more depth about our personal heritage of the journey of our ancestor’s immigration.

The second thing a teacher needs to do for this unit is to refer often to the core and have valid assessments to check that that the learners are getting the concepts necessary. The teacher should feel accountable for the learners grasping of the core objectives.

Lastly, and essentially, an understanding of the material you will be teaching.  As a teacher a checklist for knowledge of these listed topics will be needed: knowledge of reasons for exploration and settlement in the New World, capability of describing the events that motivated expansion of the United States such as the railroad, the gold rush, unpopulated territory, Louisiana Purchase (Lewis and Clark),  and pioneers are a few. Resources and background knowledge of the contributions of individuals, groups, and movements in the United States from 1900 to the present. Capability of describing how to become a citizen, identifying rights and responsibilities, and being a participant in activities that promotes the public good.

 Beginning with a fifth grade social studies text book can give you a rudimentary base. Other sources for knowledge on this topic that we found on the internet are:

~A population website: http://www.prcdc.org/summaries/usimmighistory/usimmighistory.html

~A read aloud, How Long to America? By Eve Bunting

~NCSS Standards

~Utah Core www.uen.org

~A read aloud, The Keeping Quilt By Patricia Polacco

~A website on Ellis Island, www.historychannel.com/ellisisland/index2.html

~A non-fiction novel, A Different Mirror By Ronald Takaki

~Other books:

 A Very Important Day, Marissa Moss

The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros

Immigrant Kids, Russell Freedman

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Activity Bank Chart

Social Studies

Teacher Resources

Student Reading/

Literature

Math

~ Make a KWL chart about human and child rights.

~Letter writing from an immigrant’s perspective.

~Symbols of a Flag, and creation of our own classroom flag

~Mock Ellis Island immigration process with class.

~Create a class democracy.

~Write an opinion article for the local newspaper on what our class defines the obligations of a good citizen is.

 

www.uen.org

Ellis Island: Land of Dreams
Ellis Island: Land of Hope
Ellis
Island: Land of Promise
by Joan Lowery Nixon

Journey of the Sparrows
by Fran Leeper Buss

~ Discussion with local immigrants.

~ Sonia Levitin. Journey to America. Scholastic Inc. New York. 1970

~See teacher background section

~Books about immigration

~Atlas’s

~Letters/Journals of immigrants

~Stories of immigrants or stories passed down

~Poetry lesson from famous inscription on the Statue of Liberty.

 

~Problem solving with change of climate, solving how far their heritage has traveled to get them where they are today.

~Describe facts of immigrants with fractions and percentages e.g. 25% of 3 million immigrants were Irish.

~Analyze and describe patterns of immigration of the past and today mathematically.

Art

Physical Education

Music

Technology

 

~Gallery Walk of learner’s art work portraying unit vocabulary words

~Family Tree/ Boat w/ ripples

~Design a melting pot as a class showing cultural contributions

~Re-create Statue of Liberty

~Artifact from home

~Artifact from another country

~Activity cards doing things of the past.

~Immigration Walk

~Cultural dances

~Relay races with old methods of farming etc…

~Songs from over the seas

~Haiku poem into a song

~Play cultural music through out the unit

~Make drums or other instruments from other countries

 

~How immigrating has changed through technology?

~International pen-pals

~Population websites

~Overheads of immigrating patterns/ discuss.

~Videos of immigrant’s stories.

~Individual Power Point presentations of solutions to unit question

Written Language

Field Trips/Guests

Culminating

Activity/unit Projects

Read Alouds

~The Keeping Quilt, Patricia Polacco

 

 

~Where I’m from poem by George Ella Lyon

~Interview

~Country write up

~Letter to an immigrant or from perspective of one.

~Chamber of Commerce

~ Festival of American West

~Parent Speaker

~Art Museum Exhibit

~ Set up a mock Ellis Island where the students go through the immigration process

~Who Belongs Here? By Mary Burns Knight

~When Jessie Came Across the Sea  by Amy Hest

~Grandfather’s Journey by Allen Say

Assessment

Accommodations

Science

Unit Issue

~Observation checklist

~Time activity chart (Symbols w/ key on clipboard noting students participation)

~Students solutions and reflections

~Students write a Haiku poem of their perspective on Unit question

 

~Audio Lessons

~Partner up

~Shorten or lengthen specific assignments

~Books in native language

~Visual aids and modeling

~Changes in climate and plant life effected immigrants

~Construction of a train or boat

~Growth of food

~Livestock raised

~Preservation of foods.

~Use scientific language and reasoning to describe data and research with immigrants.

~Can we have unity within our nation of immigrants?

~Can we have unity with in our classroom of students with diverse backgrounds?

Outcome/ Unit

Social Skills

Oral Language

Materials

~Unity in our own classroom

~Appreciation for all people and their backgrounds

~Acceptance of diversity

~Achieving core objectives

~Class meeting (address feelings about the unit issue)

~Cooperative learning activities

~Cultural differences, polite, impolite, and respect practiced.

~Role play

~Guest speakers

~Readers theater

~Interview

~Round Robin

~Think, Pair, Share

~Learning logs to be used through out the entire unit, as journals, responses, notes, reflections, and other various assignments.

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Organization and Subject Matter Overview with Goals and Objectives

The focus of this unit will be the question “How can we have unity in our classroom that represents a nation of immigrants?” This unit will meet three of the NCSS standards which are: 1) Give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups (NCSS 1E).  2) Demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently (NCSS 2E).  3) Explore and describe similarities and differences in ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns (NCSS 1A). The objectives to be met in the given lesson plans are from the Utah Core. They are: 1) Generate reasons for exploration and settlement in the New World (Utah Core S1 O1). 2) Describe the events that motivated expansion of the United States (Utah Core S2 O2). 3) Students analyze the contributions of individuals, groups, and movements in the United States from 1900 to the present (Utah Core S7).  4) Describe how to become a citizen, identify rights and responsibilities, and participate in activities that promote the public good (Utah Core S5 O3).

 

The organization of this unit has been planned in a way to begin with the learners as the focus.  We want to allow the learners to make connections with first their selves and personal background.  Once the learners wee the focus, the unit will expand to family and others.  This will introduce why others have explored and settled in America.  From this point the unit moves from exploring and settling to the motivation behind the expansion in America.  We feel this chronological order will help the network of connections the learners will be making.  After the lay out of immigrants arriving and expanding in America has been established, the unit moves to focusing on contributions made by individuals and groups.  This is essential to the unit question, “How can we have unity in our classroom that represents a nation of immigrants?” because we want the learners to realize we are a nation of nations and that each immigrant has added to our country.  Many immigration units have learners research the famous immigrants who came through Ellis Island.  In this unit we do not want our learners to feel that only famous people contribute to American history.  This is not the answer for unity.  The last objective of the lesson takes the class to the present time.  It focuses on what is needed to be a citizen, what human rights and responsibilities are, and how we can participate in activities that promote the public good. This last section of the unit brings the learners to thinking of their rights and also their responsibilities. This is meant to lead the learners to feeling like their actions can help the unity of our classroom and the nation they are a part of.

 

Our unit is one full of depth and in order for the learners to go deep enough and make many connections Social Studies will be the center of the classroom with all other subject matters integrated into it.

 

The classroom will be set up with desks in groups of four as base groups.  The groups of desks will be near to the front of the classroom and white board.  This will facilitate the learners to avoid distractions and keep them in good view for teacher instruction and modeling.

 

The rest of the classroom will be set up for the learners to function in and enjoy the unit.  Shelves will hold the learning logs for the class and bins that hold materials for each group.  The back of the classroom will be set up as an art gallery with track lighting.  There will be many art activities incorporated in each unit through out the year.  The art gallery will be for the learners finished pieces.  When the learners are finished with an activity they may work on art pieces that deal with the unit issue.  In the other back corner of the classroom will be a large area rug and stage.  The area rug will be for class meetings and read alouds.  The stage will be for group and individual presentations and other activities.  There will be a computer center and an extra immigrant literature center.  There will also be two tables for various stations.  There will be two back-to-back bookshelves with classroom books.  See the classroom plan below.

 

 

 

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Station

 

Desks

 

 

Desks

 

Desks

 

Desks

 

Desks

 

Desks

 

Extra Lit Books for             unit

 

Bookshelves

 

Stage

 

Area Rug

 

Station

 

Art Gallery

 

Computers

 

Learning logs/ bins/shelves

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit Planning Chart

 

Week 1

 

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Topic

 

How you came here and reasons for other immigrants to come

Events of Expansion

Contributions of Immigrants

(Include all students, no cellophane man)

Unity through good citizenship

NCSS

Standard

·          Give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups (NCSS 1E)

·          Demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently (NCSS 2E).

·          Explore and describe similarities and differences in ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns (NCSS 1A).

Utah Objective

S1 O1 Generate reasons for exploration and settlement in the New World.

S2 O2 Describe the events that motivated expansion of the United States.

S7 Students analyze the contributions of individuals, groups, and movements in the United States from 1900 to the present

S5 O3 Describe how to become a citizen, identify rights and responsibilities, participate in activities that promote the public good.

Learning

Activities

A read aloud “When Jessie Came Across the Sea, by Amy Hest. Why did Jessie come to America? Focus on the reasons for others to come to America. Make a flip book of ideas.

Small group presentations on the motivation behind cultural expansion.  (Research based, five day lesson)

Ellis Island lesson background, learners follow along in their learning logs of a pictorial chart.

A KWL on human rights focused on UNICEF rights of the child. Responsibilities for human rights.

 

A guest speaker relating their reasons for exploring and settling in America.  Student’s respond in learning logs.

Using resources and research to create a brochure advertising a group that is expanding west in the U.S.

Studying about an

Ellis Island immigrant in base groups. Present to class. (Like a mini literature circle experience)

Provide learners an opportunity to conduct a role play, “Triangle’s are not bad.” To enhance Utah core S5 03

 

Why did your family come here?  Family tree based activity.

Power points from internet research time.

Read Aloud, emphasis on individual and classroom contribution by creating a quilt by piecing individually designed squares.

Student citizen inquiry (who votes, recycles). Taking surveys and compiling graphs.

 

The importance that we are a nation of immigrants. Creation of a “Where I’m from” poem.

Posters advertising to come west

Writing letters from an immigrant standpoint to family that stayed in the native land about their new life

Setting up a classroom democracy with class input defining it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Assessment

A file folder will be kept on each child throughout the unit.  In this file, sticky notes of observations will be taken throughout the day and added to the folder.  Another ongoing unit assessment will be the learning logs that each learner will have.  In these logs, notes will be taken, drawings of maps, and graphs from teacher instruction will be imitated, rough drafts of planning projects, and personal reflections on class topics and discussions will be included.  Each learner’s log will be looked over throughout the unit and at the end.  Rubrics will be given for specific projects like the creation of a brochure.  The evaluation on their projects will be taken from the rubrics which the learners will be aware of.

            With a clipboard and previously devised symbols an assessment on group participation and engagement will be made.  The goal will be to help aid cooperation and connections for the learners to show improvement through out the unit. 

            As teachers we will continually be referring back to our objectives and standards to ensure that the overall point of our lesson is being understood and implemented.  The final assessment to see how the unit question was resolved will be the comparison of a beginning and ending class meeting discussing the unit question.  Also each learner will write a paragraph with their solution of what they personally can do to teach and incorporate unity among a classroom of immigrants into their own lives.  Because we feel this question is so important in establishing unity in our own classroom we will be referring often to the lessons learned.  In this sense there will be an ongoing assessment through out the year to see if the students internalized and implemented their understanding of cooperation and unity into our classroom.

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Lesson Plans

1)

Title of Lesson:  I am from….

Teacher(s):  Jana Martinez/ Audrey Philpot

Date: Week One

Time Allotted: 45 minutes

Grade Level(s): Fifth grade

Number of Learners:  24

 

Unit Theme:  Can we have unity within our classroom that represents a nation of immigrants?

 

Standard(s) Met: (See below)

 

Goal:-The learners will be able to give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups (NCSS, 1E)

-The learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently (NCSS, 2E).

-The learners will be able to explore and describe similarities and differences in ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns (NCSS, 1A).

 

Objectives:  Given [materials], the learners will form an “I am from” poem in order to show that we are all immigrants with different backgrounds. (Utah Core, S1 O1)

 

Materials Needed: “Where I’m from” poem by George Ella Lyon, going back to explain different stanzas and discussing why the author chose to use certain words or phrases.  Interview outline papers (24), pencils and erasers (24), Overhead projector. 

 

Motivation:  How many of you have lived here your whole lives?  Does your family do things exactly the same way the neighbors do things?  What are some memories or traditions that your family has that makes you who you are? (3 minutes)

 

Procedures:

  1. Read aloud the “Where I’m from” poem, stopping to discuss different stanzas and word choice.  Point out different sensory words she used.  (7 minutes)
  2. Discuss with the class how we all came from different backgrounds, that each of us have a different story of how we came to be here.  Share with the class how our backgrounds influence who we are and what are beliefs and values are.  Review as a class the importance of respecting diverse backgrounds. (10 minutes)
  3. Tell the class how we are going to be focusing on immigration for the next few weeks and how America and even our classroom is diverse.  We will be focusing on ways to build unity in the world and our classroom.  Each student will then create his or her own “I am from” poem.  (15 minutes)
  4. Have students share with the class or in small groups their poems.  Talk about how even students who grew up in the same town or even neighborhood had very different components of what made them who they are. (5 minutes) 

 

Accommodations:  According to the individual student’s needs I would accommodate in different areas.  I might have the poem in the student’s native language; we could talk about words in both languages.  The length of the poem could be altered according to students needs as well. 

 

Closure:  After the students have shared their poems according to their own desire, reflect on how each poem was different and yet we appreciate the differences because they add variety to our class as a whole.  Briefly talk about how this is bringing us to our next lesson about where we came from.  Have the students begin thinking about who they will talk to gather information about where their own families came from. 

(3-5 minutes).

 

Assessment/Evaluation: Review the poems to see if the students grasped the understanding that each of us our different because we each have different backgrounds.  Reflect on how we are all immigrants to this classroom and that we must find unity among us.  File in student portfolio files.  Also make notes of certain comments or questions that might need to be addressed in future lesson plans to create more unity within the classroom.

 

Extension:  Students who finish early may draw a picture or illustrate their poem.  They might also want to elongate their poem into a story of their life. 

 

Teacher Reflection: Did I allow enough time for my lesson to be adequately taught and understood?  Did I accentuate my point of unity in the classroom through the “I am from” poem?  Did I properly accommodate and extend my lesson to fit the needs of individual learners?       

 

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2)

Title of Lesson: Why explore and settle in the New World?

Teacher(s): Jana Martinez/ Audrey Philpot
Date:
Week One
Time Allotted:
60 minutes

Grade Level(s): Fifth grade
Number of Learners:
24

Unit Theme: Can we have unity within our classroom that represents a nation of immigrants?

Standard(s) Met: (See below)

Goal:-
The learners will be able to give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups (NCSS 1E).
-The learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently (NCSS 2E).
-The learners will be able to explore and describe similarities and differences in ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns (NCSS 1A).

 

Objectives: Given [materials], the learners will be able to generate reasons for exploration and settlement in the New World (Utah Core S1 O1) by creating an accordion flip book individually that portrays their understanding.

 

Materials Needed: When Jessie Came Across the Sea by Amy Hest, Chart paper for student quotes, chart paper for brainstorm web, markers, computer paper (27 pieces), 6 packs of markers, 24 packs of crayons, 24 pencils and erasers, and 6 staplers. All of these supplies will be previously separated into 6 bins. When it is time to be begin the activity they will be placed at the tables of 6 groups of 4. 24 Learning logs that are being used throughout the unit.

 

Motivation: Why do people risk leaving what they know and love to a place that is unknown?  We are immigrants or ancestors of immigrants. So why did we all end up here, list the class’s ideas on a chart paper. (5 minutes)

 

Procedures:

1. Read When Jessie Came Across the Sea, by Amy Hest, a story of one girls settlement in America.  (10 minutes)

2. Get the class thinking of WHY people would settle in America, state one example to the class.   I) There are two types of motivation for immigration for family reunification.

                        a) Push - the need to leave in order to survive

b) Pull - the attraction to a new way of life (2 minutes)

3.  Direct the class in creating a settlement in America web. Instigate the class by bringing up attributes the new land offered like: political freedom, religious tolerance, economic opportunity (better life, better job, more money), political refugees, forced immigration (slavery), family reunification, abundance of land (cheap to buy),  escape of persecution (Jews, Russians), “streets paved with gold,” “the land of opportunity.” (Guide the class with these topics; give wait time because they know many of these reasons). (15 minutes)

4. Explain to students that they will create an accordion flip book (see drawing) in their own creative way. They will list three reasons for settlement and on the flip side of the book an example or illustration for their reason. (5 min)

5. Give students the materials that have previously been separated into 6 bins, one bin per group. (1 minute)

6. Have learners make a plan in their learning logs of their flip book and then work on accordion flip books until completed. (15 min)

Accommodations: Struggling students with writing, reading, or other disabilities may have a partner help them or create a flip book with them.

 

Closure:  Switch final products of flip books with another group (the teacher will make the switch). Each learner is to look through the book they received and see what ideas and examples were different from their own. The teacher then adds to the first chart paper of listed ideas of why people settle in America. (5 minutes)

 

 

Assessment/Evaluation: Review the accordion flip books created by the learners and the input from the class on the chart paper. Compare prior knowledge activated with the read aloud, guided discussion, and review of other classmate’s ideas added to chart to assess their ability to generate reasons for exploration and settlement in America.

 

 

Extension: Students who finish early may look through the basket full of immigration children’s books.

 

Teacher Reflection: Through assessment and class participation in discussion assess whether or not the learners were able to gather the concept of reasons people explored and settled in America, make changes where necessary.

 

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3)

Title of Lesson:  How did I get here?

Teacher(s):  Jana Martinez/ Audrey Philpot

Date:  Week Two

Time Allotted: 40 minutes for this particular day, however this is one part to a five day lesson.  

Grade Level(s):  Fifth grade

Number of Learners:  24

 

Unit Theme: Can we have unity within our classroom that represents a nation of immigrants?

Standard(s) Met:  (see below)

 

Goal:  -The learners will be able to give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups (NCSS, 1E).

-The learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently (NCSS, 2E).

-The learners will be able to explore and describe similarities and differences in ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns (NCSS, 1A).

 

Objectives:  Given [materials], the learners will conduct an interview with a family member, gather documents and records about their immigrant ancestors, research their country or countries of origin and design a way to present a family tree portraying their personal immigration story in order to show the motivation behind their family or themselves coming to the Americas. (Utah Core,S2 O2)

 

Additional Teacher Information:  This particular lesson plan is one part to a week long project.  Lesson plans covering certain research techniques, interview rubrics for the interviews the learners will be conducting, and different methods of presentation will be formatted into lesson plans the learners will be receiving on individual days.  There will also be time allotted for them to conduct research during class.  Some work will need to be done at home such as the interviews.  If this particular assignment was started on a Monday, you may want to start presentations on Friday. According to your class’s needs.  When the actual project is presented to the class you will be able to evaluate if the learner grasped the concept of research, if they were able to follow the rubric by providing the information assigned, and if they were able to show the motivation behind their family or themselves immigrating to America.   

 

 

Materials Needed:  Already made family tree presentation done by teacher, interview outline forms (24), pencils and erasers (24), encyclopedias for research on countries, overhead projector, internet access for research, and computers for each student (24)

 

Motivation: As the teacher I will do a short presentation of how my family came to America, it may be a power point presentation, a written story, or a visual representation of a family tree. (5 minutes) 

 

Procedures:

  1. Talk to the learners about how all of us, if we look down the line far enough are immigrants to the Americas, or at least to a particular state.  Tell the learners that they are going to do some research on their own family’s personal immigration story.  Introduce a variety of research methods, such as interviews with a family member, personal genealogy, and internet based research about the particular country their family immigrated from. (5-7 minutes)
  2. The learners should already have asked their parents about the particular country their ancestors originated from so that they will be able to conduct research at school.  However, they can choose how far back they want the line to go.  If their parents came they can tell that story, if they are adopted they can relate their own story.  However, it must have some sort of research based information. Such as an interview or internet resources.  (5 minutes)
  3. Direct the learners to design a way they would like to present their personal immigration story e.g. artistically, written, power-point presentation.  It is up to them, but each presentation will contain the following information:
    1. a diagram of Family Tree
    2. History of immigrants

1.       Place of birth

2.       Pictures (if available)

3.       What brought them to the United States

4.       Summary of their life in their original country

5.       Examples of customs, dress, music, religion they brought to America

 

    1. Short History of the place they came from
    2. The immigrant’s effect on your family and the learner in general

 

  1. The students will begin their research and designing a creative way to present their information. (15-20 minutes)

 

Accommodations:  According to the needs of the students certain accommodations will be met such as providing information in students’ native language, guidance from the teacher.  Due to the fact that each student will choose how they want to present their information they will be able to provide some accommodation for themselves, however if someone does not have access to certain things, I will do all I can to help this be a positive experience for them. 

 

Closure:  Because this lesson will obviously be ongoing, as in I will present the assignment to them, but it will not be presented orally by them until a week later, closure will be to check up on their progress.  Making sure each student understands the requirements and is continually working on the project.  For this particular day the closure would be to check for understanding.  Have the class repeat back to me what we will be doing for the next five days.  Make sure they understand the reason behind the project and clarify any questions or concerns.

 

Assessment/Evaluation of the five days:  I will assess throughout the day as the students work on their research and put together their presentation.  I would do a symbol method of assessment and hold mini-conferences with the students in hopes to direct them if they need help.  The overall evaluation will be done when the students orally presents his or her project to the class, they will be evaluated according to the above rubric of what must be included in their reports. 

 

Extension:  The students will be allowed the freedom to extend this assignment as much as they would like.  As long as the basic rubric is followed they can be as elaborate with their project as they wish.  If they need guidance in extending their project I will offer ideas such as adding more pictures, artifacts, interviewing more than one person, doing both sides of the family… etc.

 

Teacher Reflection:  I would need to reflect throughout this assignment on how the learners are handling themselves, are they doing valid research?  Is the research providing useful information for them?  Did it work for my class to allow them the freedom of choosing their own method of presentation?  Did I allow enough time for the learners to complete the project?  Did I accommodate and extend to meet all of the learners needs?  Did the learners gain an appreciation for theirs and others cultural backgrounds?

 

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4)

Title of Lesson: Room to grow, expansion in America, Come today!

Teacher(s): Jana Martinez/ Audrey Philpot
Date:
Week Two
Time Allotted:
80 minutes

Grade Level(s): Fifth grade
Number of Learners:
24

Unit Theme: Can we have unity within our classroom that represents a nation of immigrants?

Standard(s) Met: (See below)

Goal:-
The learners will be able to give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups (NCSS 1E).
-The learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently (NCSS 2E).
-The learners will be able to explore and describe similarities and differences in ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns (NCSS 1A).

 

Objectives:  Given [materials] the students will be able to describe the events that motivated expansion of the United States and apply their knowledge to creating a persuasive brochure (Utah Core S 2 O 2).

 

Materials needed: 12 resource books (2 per table), 48 example brochures (from a travel agency, 2 per student), computer lab access with word processing and brochure template, 24 pieces of white plain paper for rough draft. 6 bins (separate into bins, the resource books, example brochures, scratch paper for rough draft, and rubric for the brochure) Note: the learners are familiar with the procedure to complete work at the computer lab, they are aware of the rules in the lab and traveling to and from the lab, one overhead sheet of the designed rubric that will be used to grade the assignment with specific criteria.

 

Motivation: Show learners an example of a brochure persuading them to travel to Disney Land or Alaska. Be exciting; show the features, the availability of options for travel packages, accommodation, prices, and other exciting offers. Illustrate that these companies have a goal in mind and that is to convince you to go for their offer. Expansion in the United States happened Show them a photo’s of old advertisements to move west, to work for the railroad,  for the gold rush, unpopulated territory, Louisiana Purchase (Lewis and Clark), Pioneer, (some of these will be review). If you were a blacksmith, a farmer, a seamstress, what would have gotten you to move westward? What was so exciting about the gold rush or unpopulated land? Your job is to research from the resource books given to your table to find out more about the temptations of moving west, more money, more land. Each group will create a brochure that convinces the rest of the class we want to move west because of your topic. Show the overhead that has the criteria for the assignment (2 facts about the topic given, 1 art element, and at least 1 use of convincing “brochure talk.” (5 minutes)

 

Procedures:

1. Send one student to get a bin with their groups number placed on top of bin. The topics will be: gold rush, railroad, unpopulated area and more land, opportunity for self government, Louisiana Purchase, Homestead Act, territorial wars, inventions e.g. steamboat, cotton gin.

2. Each group will first brainstorm their topic by discussion and creating a web.

3. Each individual in a group will create one column for the brochure that will include: 2facts on their topic, 1 piece of art, and at least 1 persuasive comment (a convincing sentence, “brochure talk”).

4. Learners begin to use their resource books for research and the sample brochures for ideas.

5. Learners take notes in their learning log and create rough draft plan on a white piece of paper.

6.  As groups approve their rough draft with the teacher they may go to the computer lab to create the brochure online (the time is scheduled with the Lab Instructor ahead of time, and he or she will aid in compiling the information on the template).

7. Learners may use clip art for their brochure or leave spaces for an illustration.

8. Print brochures and come back to class.

9.  With group plan the marketing presentation of your brochure to share with the class.

(60 minutes)

 

Accommodations: Struggling students with writing, reading, or other disabilities will have a partner to create a column with. Learners struggling may help in design and picture choice rather than writing if they have difficulties with language skills.  Different levels of books will be offered for appropriateness for varied intensity and skill level of learners.

 

Closure:   Tell Learners that word of mouth, signs, and other forms of advertisement as the county has progressed motivated expansion in the United States. Our nation increased in immigrants due to the expansions and opportunities.  A brochure is one way to advertise, persuade, and convince people of an idea.

Learners are offered the chance to share their brochure to the class with a goal to convince the class to move west because of their topic. They will use both fact and convincing tactics. (15 min)

 

Assessment/Evaluation: 

1. Learners will be assessed by their learning log notes, group web, and rough draft showing their research efforts to describe westward expansion on their given topic.

 

2. Learners will be evaluated by their group’s brochure; each column will discuss two facts of their given topic, one art element, and at least one persuasive use of “brochure language.”

 

Additional Assessment to help the smoothness of the class:

1. Teacher will give continuous verbal and visual assessment to aid learners throughout the brochure making process by observing their understanding of the assignment and on task behavior.

2. Observe group interaction and facilitate where needed if groups are not working cooperatively.

 

Extension: Learners who finish early may look through the basket full of immigration children’s books. Learners may also make props or parts to their mini class presentations.

 

Teacher Reflection:  I will reflect on the management issue of having students working cooperatively in groups both in the classroom and computer lab. If I feel one particular class is not ready for the technology part of this class I could adapt this assignment to be hand made brochures instead of using word processing.

 

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5)

Title of Lesson:  Quilt Unity

Teacher(s):  Jana Martinez/ Audrey Philpot

Date: Week Three 

Time Allotted:  45-50 minutes

Grade Level(s): Fifth grade

Number of Learners:  24

 

Unit Theme: Can we have unity within our classroom that represents a nation of immigrants?

Standard(s) Met: (See below)

 

Goal:-The learners will be able to give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups (NCSS, 1E)

-The learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently (NCSS, 2E).

-The learners will be able to explore and describe similarities and differences in ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns (NCSS, 1A).

 

Objectives:  Given [materials], the learners will listen to a read aloud about an immigrant who brought with her a quilt, contribute to a theme based quilt by each creating a square and piece the quilt as a whole in order to show how different contributions have been made to our society through different cultures and through combining each contribution we can create beauty and harmony.  (Utah Core, S7)

 

Materials Needed:  The keeping quilt by Patricia Polacco, pre-cut pieces of 5x5 colored papers, markers for each table, crayons for each table, pencils, erasers, tape.  (Supplies will be in bins at each table prior to lesson).

 

Motivation:  Show different cultural artifacts, such as wooden shoes (klompen), woven baskets, and quilts where each square is different but works together.  Briefly discuss the concept of how a quilt is different squares pieced and working together to create harmony. (5 minutes)

 

Procedures: 

1.  Read aloud The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco, stopping to talk about certain cultural aspects.  Emphasizing how culture is passed on from generation to generation. Discuss certain aspects of the book such as how our family’s cultural background affects us today.  (10 minutes)

2.  Discuss with the learners how each of them are going to create a single square of a bigger quilt with paper.  Present to the learners a quilt square already made by you.  (3 minutes)

3.  They will each decorate their single square with a cultural tradition or artifact they use in their own family.  (15-20 minutes)

4.  When the learners are finished decorating their quilt squares they will create a harmonious quilt by gluing the squares in strategic places on a bigger piece of chart paper.  (10 minutes)

5.    Display the finished quilt on a chosen wall of the room.

 

Accommodations:  Depending on the needs of the individual learners I would adapt accordingly.  Such as directly modeling how to decorate a quilt square.  Some children may need bigger crayons or markers for fine motor skills.  Second language learners will need help understanding certain vocabulary. 

 

Closure:  On a volunteer basis the learners may point out their particular quilt square and share how a cultural tradition or artifact has influenced and contributed to their life or society.  (5 minutes)

 

Assessment/Evaluation:  Look at the learner’s quilt squares to make sure the cultural artifacts are valid means of contribution and enhancement to their lives.  Check the overall quilt to see if the learners put thought into making it harmonious.  If time permits you may have the children write a journal entry of how they feel about cultural contributions and why it is important for us to learn from other cultures.

 

Extension:  Learners who finish early may write a story about their quilt square relaying more information of why that particular item is important to them or society.  They could also make another quilt square to take home.

 

Teacher Reflection:  Did my lesson flow smoothly?  Was the objective adequately portrayed and met by the learners?  Were the learners able to generate ideas for a harmonious quilt?  Did the learners have enough time allotted to properly complete this activity?  Did I extend and accommodate adequately?

 

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6)

Title of Lesson: A view from an Ellis Island Immigrant

Teacher(s): Jana Martinez/ Audrey Philpot
Date:
Week Three
Time Allotted: 60
minutes

Grade Level(s): Fifth grade
Number of Learners:
24

Unit Theme: Can we have unity within our classroom that represents a nation of immigrants?
Standard(s) Met: (See below)

Goal:-
The learners will be able to give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups (NCSS 1E).
-The learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently (NCSS 2E).
-The learners will be able to explore and describe similarities and differences in ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns (NCSS 1A).

 

Objectives:   Given [materials] learners will participate in a mini literature circle about an immigrant and present their study in order to analyze the contributions of individuals, groups, and movements in the United States from 1900 to the present (Utah Core S 7).

 

Materials needed: 6 packets on an immigrant from the book Ellis Island Interviews in their own words by Peter Morton Coan. The packets will be on, Mario Vina, Southern Italy (4copies), Theodore Spako, Greece (4 copies), Esther Rosenbaum, Ukraine (4 copies), June Gusoff, Palestine (4 copies), Garth Svenson, Denmark (4 copies), Jose and Consuela Martinez, Portugal (4 copies). Like a literature circle each learner will have their own copy to read in the group. CD or cassette tape of Neil Diamond’s “We’re coming to America.”  The 24 learning logs that will be used through out the unit.

 

Motivation: Play Neil Diamond’s “We’re coming to America.” Have the learners imagine the excitement, the possibility, the chance for new life, to make a difference, and to be free. Now in literature circle groups the learners will read to themselves about an immigrant’s journey to America. Encourage the learners to picture the immigrant as if they were them, friends with them, or back in time.  (5 minutes)

 

Procedures:

1. Explain to learners that they will first read their copy about an immigrant and if they finish before the rest of the group they may take notes in their learning log for this unit. When the rest of the group is finished they may discuss the handout and take notes then. As a group they will need to decide what they want to share with the class about their immigrant. They should be looking for what that individual contributed for their family, self, friends, and country. This can be through sacrifices, work, or another example they find in the hand out.

2. Hand out immigrant packets to each group.

3. Learners will read silently about the immigrant they are given.

4. Learners will take notes in learning log while waiting for the rest of the group.

5. In base groups the learners will discuss the immigrant they were given, make notes in learning logs, and decide what they will share with the rest of the class.

6.  Each group then decides a creative way to show the class the significance of their immigrant.  (35 minutes)

 

Accommodations: A learner may pair up with another learner and whisper share read. A learner may have another learner summarize for them about their immigrant.  A learner may read about an immigrant in their native tongue (If I have a learner who would comprehend the reading material in another language I will have a packet translated).  I do have family members who speak Spanish, for other languages I would find someone to help translate.

 

Closure:  Each group will present in their own creative way something that their immigrant contributed to life. The teacher will close by emphasizing that all of us contribute to life, we do not have to be famous to be significant.  (20 minutes)

 

Assessment/Evaluation:  The learners will be evaluated by participating in note taking in their learning log and their group presentation on a specific immigrant and their significance.

 

Extension: If a group finishes early they may look up the origin of their surname http://www.genealogyweb.com/ellisisland.html they can also do this on the classroom computers during recess or between other lessons and activities.

 

Teacher Reflection:  I will be looking to see if this lesson is authentic enough for students to realize the contributions and sacrifices made by immigrants. I will also be looking to see if I have accommodated my learners to complete this lesson.

 

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7)

Title of Lesson:  Triangles are not bad!

Teacher(s):  Jana Martinez/ Audrey Philpot

Date: Week Four

Time Allotted: 40 minutes

Grade Level(s): Fifth grade

Number of Learners:  24

 

Unit Theme: Can we have unity within our classroom that represents a nation of immigrants?

Standard(s) Met: (See below)

 

Goal:-The learners will be able to give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups (NCSS, 1E)

-The learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently (NCSS, 2E).

-The learners will be able to explore and describe similarities and differences in ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns (NCSS, 1A).

 

Objectives: Given [materials], the learners will conduct a role play in order to show and understand responsibilities and participate in experiences that promote public good.  (Utah Core, S5 O3) 

 

Materials Needed:  Script (provided at end of lesson plan), paper and pencils for each student (24).

 

Motivation:  As a class, draw a web chart on the board discussing what makes us different from each other.  Ask how we deal with differences in our families, communities, and in particular the classroom. (5 minutes)

 

Procedures:

1.  The teacher assigns one speaking part to each student and the poster for that part.  Speaking parts might be one paragraph per student.  (3-5 minutes)

2.  The whole class needs to participate at one time, you may want to review good listening skills and showing respect for the person speaking.  (1-2 minutes)

3.  Each person states their given part in order.  (10-15 minutes)

4.  After the script is done being read by the learners, you will want to discuss the theme of the role play.  Ask learners what their favorite part of the role play was.  Ask how certain parts of the role play made them feel. (5-7 minutes)

5.  Each student will need to write down three ideas they have which will contribute to the public good as a classroom.  These will be written on chart paper to hang in the classroom in order to get them ready for a future lesson discussing citizen’s rights and conducting a class meeting. (7-10 minutes)

 

Accommodations:  According to the learners individual needs certain accommodations will need to addressed such as speaking and reading parts might need to be shortened or made into bigger print for particular students.  Also second language learners may not comprehend the analogy of shapes being used, so that might need to be explained in greater detail.

 

Closure:  The class will share a few of their ideas for contributing to public good and I will put them down on an overhead to be transferred onto chart paper. (3-5 minutes)

Assessment/Evaluation:  Review the ideas generated by the class on how to contribute to public good.  File in student portfolio files.

 

Extension:  Learners may write more ideas or elaborate on their ideas already written.

 

Teacher Reflection:  As a teacher do I contribute to the public good of the classroom by accepting and positively promoting differences and how they enhance our classroom?  How can I more fully appreciate my students and their differences?  Do I give feedback promptly so students can accurately assess what it is I am conveying, is my feedback more positive or negative?

 

 

Script: 

Here are the squares.  They live all by themselves in Square Town.  Here are the Circles.  They live all by themselves in Circle Town.  Here are the Triangles.  They live all by themselves in Triangle Town.  Here are the Rectangles.  They live all by themselves in Rectangle Town.  The Squares do not like the Circles.  The Circles do not like the Triangles.  The Triangles do not like the Rectangles.  The Rectangles do not like the Squares.  They do not like anyone but themselves.  They think the others are stupid, lazy, and mean, and bad! Bad! Bad!  The Squares say this:  “If you want to be smart and beautiful, and good, you must have four sides exactly the same.  If you don’t have four sides exactly the same, then you are stupid, and ugly and bad! Bad! Bad!

 

The Circles say this:  “If you want to be smart and beautiful, and good, you must be perfectly round, and if you’re not perfectly round, then you are stupid, and ugly and bad! Bad! Bad!

 

The Triangles say this:  “If you want to be smart and beautiful, and good, you must have three sides.  If you don’t have three sides, then you are stupid, and ugly and bad! Bad! Bad!

 

The Rectangles say this:  “If you want to be smart and beautiful, and good, you must have two short sides exactly the same, and you must have two long sides exactly the same.  If you do not have two short sides and two long sides, then you are stupid, and ugly and bad! Bad! Bad!

 

One beautiful summer day the little Squares, and the little Circles, and the little Triangles, and the little Rectangles went out to play.  But not together.

 

While they were playing, a terrible thing happened.  The little Circles were playing on top of the hill.  Some of them slipped and went rolling down the hill.  Faster and faster, they rolled to the very bottom of the hill where the little Rectangles were playing. 

 

The Rectangles were very angry.  They thought the Circles were very bad to roll into the Rectangles’ very own playground.  They called the Circles bad names, and threw rocks at them. 

 

The Circles were frightened.  The Squares and Triangles heard the yelling and crying.  They ran as fast as they could to see what was happening and they started yelling and throwing stones.  There was more and more yelling and more and more crying.  It was terrible!

 

At last one of the Rectangles became so angry that he leaped into the air and came down right on top of the Circles.  Oh, Wonder of Wonder!  Everyone was absolutely quiet.  No one said a word!  They just looked and looked and looked. 

 

The Rectangles and the Circles had made a wagon!  A lovely beautiful wagon!

 

And then everyone became excited.  They all wanted to make something.  The Squares and Circles made a train.  A Rectangle made the smokestack.  Some Circles made smoke.  The Triangles and Rectangles made trees.

 

They all worked together and made a lovely house.  They made things that were pretty.  (e.g., sun, boat, jack-in-the-box, houses and flowers).  They made things that were fun.  Everyone had a wonderful marvelous, beautiful time. 

 

When it was time to go home, they all sang a little song!  “We are glad, glad, glad! Being different isn’t bad!”  and they sang it over and over, all they way home.  The End

 

(Script adapted from University of Oklahoma)    

 

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8)

Title of Lesson: Rights of a Citizen

Teacher(s): Jana Martinez/ Audrey Philpot
Date:
Beginning of the year
Time Allotted:
30minutes

Grade Level(s): Fifth grade
Number of Learners:
24

Unit Theme: Can we have unity within our classroom that represents a nation of immigrants?

Standard(s) Met: (See below)

Goal:-
The learners will be able to give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups (NCSS 1E).
-The learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently (NCSS 2E).
-The learners will be able to explore and describe similarities and differences in ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns (NCSS 1A).

 

Objectives: Given [materials], the learners will collaborate and list innate rights of a child to compare to the UNICEF Child Rights in order to be able to describe how to become a citizen, identify rights and responsibilities and participate in activities that promote the public good. (Utah Core S5 O3).

 

Materials Needed: Chart paper (at least 4 pieces), Learning logs (24, one for each student going through out the unit), Markers for chart paper, 20 3x5 cards with random numbers on them, 5 brand new pens, pencils, erasers, or markers for the chosen students (see motivation).

 

Motivation:  In a serious manner take pencils away from all learners except five. Give number cards out to each learner to replace their name except for five. Praise the five chosen children, give them high fives. Give each one of the five chosen students a new pencil, pen, marker, or eraser. Pause and look for learner’s reactions. How do those of you who have number’s now instead of names feel? How did you feel when I only gave high fives to a few students? Do all of you have the right to get a high five, a name, and a pencil? (5minutes)

 

Procedures:

1. Ask the learners:

What do you think human rights are? (Wait time)

They are basic rights and freedoms that all humans are entitled, they include the right to life, liberty, freedom of thought and expression, and equality before the law.

What do you think the rights are of a child? Do they have rights? (UNICEF, 1959)

2. All children do have rights; these rights are for children world wide. In each group you will be given a topic dealing with a right for children. Given your topic come up with as many rights you can think of that go with the topic.

3. Pass out topic papers: health, shelter, love, person, assistance, work.

4. Make a KWL chart, the ‘K’ is what the learners generate from the guided categories of rights.

5. Tell the class that, UNICEF which is an organization that works for children's rights, survival, development and protection came up with a Declaration of the Rights of the Child in 1959.

6. The KWL ‘W’ part is teacher guided in comparing what the class came up with as rights to UNICEF’s declaration. Post the declaration up in sentence strips. Have students compare their rights to the declaration.

Declaration of the Rights of the Child (UNICEF, 1959)

1. All children have the right to what follows, no matter what their race, color, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, or where they were born or who they were born to.

2.  You have the special right to grow up in a healthy and normal way, free and with dignity.

3.  You have a right to a name and to be a member of a country.

4.  You have the right to good food, housing, and medical care.

5.  You have the right to special care if handicapped in any way.

6.  You have the right to love and understanding, preferably from parents, but from the government when you have no parent.

7.  You have the right to go to school for free, to play, and to have an equal chance to be what you are and to learn to be responsible and useful.

8.  You have the right always to be among the first to get help.

9.  You have the right not to be harmed and not to be hired for work until old enough.

 

7. Have students compare their ides of human (specifically child) rights to the declaration from UNICEF. The ‘K’ and ‘W’ are the rights; the ‘L’ is the responsibilities we have to live the rights.

8. The ‘L’ section in the KWL for what they learn will be a brainstorm for what and how they want to change themselves and in our classroom concerning rights. (20 minutes)

 

Accommodations: Struggling students with writing, reading, or other disabilities may have a partner help them when generating ideas.  They can orally say the change they want to make in the classroom and in themselves for the assessment or have a partner help them write it.

 

Closure:  Refer back to the beginning of the lesson. I the teacher was taking away rights that belong to the learners. All of us have human rights, every child in the world is entitled to these UNICEF rights, no matter if they live in the U.S. or not. These rights shouldn’t be taken away just because they immigrate to another country. These rights belong to them. Have learners write in their learning log for this unit what human rights means to them and a change they can make in showing their classmates that they have each have rights. Collect the number cards, collect the given pencil or item from the chose five, and tell your class that they all have the same rights. (5 minutes)

 

Assessment/Evaluation: The class will be observed as a whole when they are identifying the rights of a child. They will be assessed individually by their entry in their learning logs regarding their understanding of rights and how they will change in their treatment of people in our classroom.

 

Extension: If the lesson goes quicker than planned on another chart paper we can make our rights as learners in our classroom. Learners who finish early may reflect more in their learning logs on other lessons, or reflections.

 

Teacher Reflection: At the end of the lesson I will be looking for the reaction in my students. Were they shocked that they had innate rights and did they respond to this issue. If I see they didn’t connect to this lesson and idea I could make the introduction more motivating by exaggerating the rights of learners in my classroom even more.

 

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Appendix 

References:

            ~Other teachers

            ~Friends with different ethnic backgrounds

            ~Utah Core/ www.uen.org

            ~National Council for the Social Studies

Children’s Literature Resources:

            ~The Keeping Quilt, Patricia Polacco

~The Long Road, Luis Garay
~The Tangerine Tree, Regina Hanson

~The Morning Chair, Barbara Joosse
~An Ellis Island Christmas, Maxinne Rhea Leighton
~All the Lights in Night, Arthur A. Levine
~Coming to America: The Story of Immigration, Betsy Maestro

~Aekyung’s Dream, Min Paek
~The American Wei, Marion Hess Pomeranc
~The Silence in the Mountains, Liz Rosenburg

~Annushka’s Voyage, Edith Tarbescu

Websites:
http://www.timeforcitizenship.com/teachers/citizenship_main.asp?t=teachers

~A population website: http://www.prcdc.org/summaries/usimmighistory/usimmighistory.html
~A website on Ellis Island, www.historychannel.com/ellisisland/index2.html
~www.cac.cc.az.us/TitleV

 

Other books:

~A non-fiction novel, A Different Mirror By Ronald Takaki
A Very Important Day, Marissa Moss
The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros
Immigrant Kids, Russell Freedman

 

 

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