By: Staci Hankins

Fly Away Home

Grade 2

Objectives:

Students will demonstrate their knowledge that everyone has a human right to have a home by representing it with a poem.

 

Materials:

Bunting, E. (1991). Fly Away Home. New York: Clarion.
A young boy and his father are living in an airport. There are rules to living at the airport. The first rule is not to be noticed. The second rule is to dress like nobody. The third rule is to not sit by others that are living at the airport. The boy sees a boy that is stuck in the airport and tells it to "fly away home". He also sees all the people that are coming and going. He feels sad when they all talk about their own homes that they are going to. He feels that he may be there forever, but knows that someday he himself will "fly away home".

10-15 pictures of different houses around the world

list of human rights on big chart paper

poem examples

sentence-strips (one about house and one about home) (A house is a place of shelter where a group of people or one family live. A home is where a person can find safety or live in security with people that they love. A home is the people and the feeling they have for each other.)

Procedures:

1. There are pictures of different houses around the world placed throughout the room. Before the story Fly Away Home choose 10-15 children to bring one picture from around the room that reminds them of their house and/or one that they like to the circle (rug where children gather to discuss topics) to discuss. Ask the children, "What are the differences and similarities of the houses?" Leave the pictures up on an easel or whiteboard to refer to later.

2. "We have been discussing different types of homes for animals. Now we are going to discover the similarities and differences of where people live."

3. "What kind of house do you think that this boy lives in?" (Show cover of the book Fly Away Home.) "What kind of activities do you think that this boy does in his house?" Begin to read the book. While reading ask the children questions about the boy's house. "What makes it a home? What makes where he lives a house?" This is a type of KWL that will help in later discussion.

4. After reading the book show word strips of house and home and read together as a class. "A house is a place of shelter where a group of people or one family live." "A home is where a person can find safety or live in security with people that they love. A home is also the people and the feeling they have for each other."

5. After finishing the book and reading the sentence strips revisit the pictures from around the room. Ask the children "What makes it a house, and what makes it a home? What is the same about your home and the boy's home in the story? What is different?"

6. Write on chart paper or the whiteboard the words and information that the children are saying. From this list tell them there is another list that we can look at, and it is called the "Children's Rights". "On this list it tells us what children have a right to have, let's see if this boy has the things that are on this list of children's rights."

7. Show the children the children's human rights list. Read the list together and ask the children if they see a right that the boy in the book has and ones he does not have.

8. Have the children gather in the circle and think of words that can describe a home using the letters H. O. M. E. and write them on the board so children can refer to them later.

9. Have the list of children's rights up on an easel or the whiteboard so that children can refer to the list to make their poem.

10. Children will be excused to their desks to put together their own poem using the letters H.O. M. E.

Evaluation/Assessment:

1. Students will demonstrate their knowledge that every one is entitled to a home, by writing a poem using the letters H.O.M.E.

Examples of H.O.M.E. poems:

H ome is where I want to be,

O pen to my friends and family.

M eals are here and they are great. .

E ven when it's good for me.

 

H appy.

O pen.

M usic.

E ducational.

 

Children's Rights modified from globalclassroom.org/rights1.html

1. The right to be treated equally no matter what race, religion or if you are a boy or girl.

2. The right to develop in a healthy manner.

3. The right to a have a name and your own culture.

4. The right to enough food (3 square meals a day).

5. The right to a secure living unit.

6. The right to receive love, understanding and protection.

7. The right to free education, to play and recreation.

8. The right to live in a house that is a safe place.

9. The right to special care, if handicapped and regular doctor visits.

10. The right to shelter from harsh weather.