By: R. Lucinda Dunn

A Peaceful World

Grade Level: 4th&endash; 5th grade

Time Needed: 5 + class periods (depending on size of groups)

Objectives:

1. Given a short answer test, Students will be able to recognize the rights of children, what they mean, how the rights are violated, and how students can uphold those rights.

2. Students will be able to express their knowledge and feelings about a right of their choosing.

Materials Needed:

Paper, pencils, human right pictures, writer notebooks, art supplies, statements by United Nations and/or UNICEF on rights of a child (see www.unicef.ca/eng/unicef/sch_election/supp.html), resource material (encyclopedias, website lists, books, etc.) for children rights

Moments of Extinction: Indigenous People and Remote Places (http://www.psilakis.gr)

United Nations Staff Photography Gallery- (http://www0.un.org/cyberschoolbus/gallery/staffphoto/thumbs.asp)

overhead or poster paper.

Procedures:

1. Read the poem Hug O' War by Shel Silverstein

Hug O' War

I will not play at tug o' war.

I'd rather play at hug o' war.

Where everyone hugs

Instead of tugs,

Where everyone giggles

And rolls on the rug,

Where everyone kisses,

And everyone grins,

And everyone cuddles,

And everyone WINS!

 

2. Discuss the poem that you read.

What would the world be like if people hugged more?

What are some ways that you can treat people equally?

How should people be treated?

What are some basic rights that children have?

3. Introduce what the United Nations and/or UNICEF stand is on rights of children.

4. On an overhead or poster paper, make a list of what rights children have (See www.unicef.ca/eng/unicef/sch_election/supp.html for a list of rights) You could begin the sentence "Children have the right to...."

5. Allow students to choose a right that they want to learn more about. Divide the students into groups according to right interests.

6. Allow each group time to research their right. Provide resource information to help them learn more about their topic.

** You may have students view drawings of other children from around the world related to their right they are focusing on. (Some good resources are listed in materials)

7. Each student (within the group) will choose a way to portray the right that they have studied. (This could be done through writing, art, music, etc.) They will include the following information:

- Why they chose the right

- What the right means

- Ways the right is honored

-Ways the right is violated

- How students can uphold the right

- What their display means to them as a group and individually

8. Each group will then combine their artifacts to create a display about the right they have chosen.

9. You may choose to have students use software (such as hyper studio, PowerPoint, etc.) to create a class display (i.e. slide show or QuickTime movie) of students work for the classroom. or if preferred, you could create a paper-based display ( i.e. class book, bulletin board, etc.)

10. Each group will present their display to the rest of the class. They will share the following information with the class:

- Why they chose the right

- What the right means

- Ways the right is honored

-Ways the right is violated

- How students can uphold the right

- What their display means to them as a group and individually.

Assessment:

1. Students will choose a right they want to learn about. They will then express the knowledge gained and feeling they have for the right through writing or art.

2. After presentations and review of rights, students will take a test focusing on the information presented by each group, including what the rights of children are and what they mean.