By: DARCI MOCK

FREEDOM

GRADES: 4-6

OBJECTIVES:

1. Students will be able to discuss as a group and list causes and effects of oppression

2. Students will be able to through written expression, express opinion on human rights issue.

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Books

Seuss, Dr. (1986). Yertle the turtle and other stories. New York, N.Y. : Random House. ISBN 0394900871

Rose Blanche: Roberto Innocenti,

Terrible Things: An Allegory of the Holocaust: Eve Bunting

The Bracelet: by Yoshiko Uchida

Faithful Elephants: A True Story of Animals, People, and War: by Yukio Tsuchiya

Hiroshima No Pika: by Toshi Maruki

Baseball Saved Us: by Ken Mochizuki

Heroes: by Ken Mochizuki

The Wall: by Ronald Himler

Chart paper with four columns and the length

PROCEDURES:

1. ANTICIPATORY SET: Read Dr. Suess's Yertle the Turtle.

"We are going to read a book about a group of turtles. I want you to think of what is happening with them. Is it right? Why does Yertle do what he does? Why do people do what he says? Think of why the story ends how it does."

Read the book

After the book briefly ask a few questions:

Who has the power? (fill in the responses on the chart paper)

What did the one in power do to others?

"This is called oppression?" (fill in the responses on the chart paper)

Who fought against the oppression? (fill in the responses on the chart paper)

What significant event ended the oppression? (fill in the responses on the chart paper)

What rights do you think all of the turtles in the pond should have?

What can be done to make sure that the turtles are not victims of oppression again?

What would you do if you had been one of the turtles?

Have chart paper accessible to chart oppressed, oppression, and what kind of oppression. This will be used throughout the lesson.

Who has power?

Who was being oppressed? Why?

What kind of oppression was occurring?

What caused the oppression to end?

2. Group review of books:

Give a list of the questions (listed above) from Yertle the Turtle to each group.

The teacher will split the class up into groups of four.

Each group will pick one book. Have the following books available for choice in an open area of the room.

Rose Blanche: Roberto Innocenti,

Terrible Things: An Allegory of the Holocaust: Eve Bunting

The Bracelet: by Yoshiko Uchida

Faithful Elephants: A True Story of Animals, People, and War: by Yukio Tsuchiya

Hiroshima No Pika: by Toshi Maruki

Baseball Saved Us: by Ken Mochizuki

Heroes: by Ken Mochizuki

The Wall: by Ronald Himler

In each group there will be a reader, writer, discussion leader, and speaker (students choose their part).

The reader will read the book to the others (the reader may ask others to participate, but others are not obligated to read.)

The writer will take notes for the group write the outcomes for the questions on the chart board in the front of the room.

The discussion leader will lead the discussion regarding the questions associated with their book.

The speaker will briefly share the book with the rest of the class. The speaker will point out who, what, when, why, where, and how.

Tell them 30 minutes will be given to read and discuss their book. During this time the writers may freely write on the chart board in the front of the room when each group is finished.

After each group has written their review on the chart paper in the front of the room have each speaker briefly tell about their book.

3. Whole Class Review: Together as a class analyze similarities and differences with their books.

What causes oppression?

What would you feel like if you were oppressed?

What can you do to help others that have their rights taken from them

Why does denying human rights lead to oppression?

4. Personal Reflection: Students will take an issue discussed and relate it to their lives. (This paper will not be due for one week.)

Criteria: Must be on a human rights issue observed in the books

Criteria: Must express through the writing personal opinion and feeling.

Some ideas (but not limited to)

Write a letter to a friend as if you were the main character in the story.

Write a poem about an issue regarding freedom

Look at the world. Find a country that is being oppressed and write a short paper on how you could help just one person on that country.

Write a short story about human rights and your life. (This can be nonfiction and freedoms can be taken away.)

EVALUATION:

1. Examine responses on butcher paper. Do their group responses indicate causes and effects of oppression?

2. In students writing look for opinions and personal belief linked to human rights issue.